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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,305

    Thumbs down You are asking for trouble...

    I'd keep forced air vents & esp. returns well away from an open Fp. Make sure you seal the ducts with mastic and test with Duct Blaster and a Blower Door test for house. Min. 0.35 ACH. Per ASHRAE 62.2-2004, all mechanical ventilation must have makeup air unless a blower door test proves sufficient passive leakage. Seal the top of the house tight as Tupperware with makeup air introduced as low as possible. Keep foot traffic away from Fp as much as possible. Make sure the chimney is at least 2 ft. taller than the house's equivalent stack ht.

    There's a lot more but if you're hell bent on putting vents near a Fp, I'd start with this list to prevent smoke spillage. However, since you sound more concerned with sucking up a smidge of heat to redistribute it, I'd highly recommend plenty of good smoke alarms along with some professional grade CO alarms that exceed UL 2034 in sensitivity.
    Good luck--I think you're going to need it.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    8

    Re: You are asking for trouble...

    Originally posted by hearthman
    I'd keep forced air vents & esp. returns well away from an open Fp.
    The returns won't be close at all. I am talking about a vent which is positioned towards the top of an 18' cathedral ceiling. I am not saying that I would install some kind of HRV venting system right next to the wood stove, or right above the wood stove, or anywhere at all close to the wood stove. (Or at least I don't believe 15' to be 'close to the wood stove.')

    These HRVs are designed to pick up warm or hot air and recycle a fraction of it. I'm not POSITIVE, but I would not imagine the ceiling area to be any warmer than 90-100 degrees.

    Anyway, the HRV engineer should be able to keep us safe.

    Martin

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    2

    ok how about this?

    what if there is a cast concrete wall behind woodstove laced with copper tubes to absorb heat energy and carry away the heated water to add to hydronic syatem? this would seem to avoid cooling either the stove pipe or fire box. The water would also not be too hot, i think ,to complement the system. any comments on this aproach?

  4. #17
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    8

    Re: ok how about this?

    Originally posted by dkellum
    what if there is a cast concrete wall behind woodstove laced with copper tubes to absorb heat energy and carry away the heated water to add to hydronic syatem? this would seem to avoid cooling either the stove pipe or fire box. The water would also not be too hot, i think ,to complement the system. any comments on this aproach?
    I'm not an expert by any means - which is why I'm asking my questions here!

    The only thing I can comment on this approach has to do with maintainability. The concrete is definitely caustic. And I would want to have access to the copper pipes for repairs over a period of time.

    I also imagined something like a framed box surrounding the stove pipe. Inside the framed box would be a heat exchanger. And the box would be insulated in a way that would protect the surrounding structures.

    Well, if I insulated the stove pipe then the heat generated from those pipes would never make it to the intended people who started the fire to begin with! Might not be a bad thing though. I've concluded that the fireplace is only for my personal aesthetic enjoyment. No functional attribute other than that. So I would be happy to simply have a flickering flame with no heat output - and it would be terrific if (as you want) I could capture a bit of that energy to support even-heating radiant floors, domestic hot water, bubbling jacuzzi, etc.

    Good luck,
    Martin

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Northern Virginia, Fairfax County
    Posts
    641
    This is a very interesting discussion with highly complex technology seeping in from the background. Before I got to the description of the 18 foot cathedral ceiling, I was already thinking about ceiling fans.

    With that type of ceiling, you could also think about this simple, inexpensive technology. Ceiling fans would dampen or smooth out the varying levels of sensible heat coming from the wood stove or fireplace. And depending on the design of the rest of the house, you may get some impact on other rooms as well. Especially if you decide on a wood stove instead of a fireplace, you want to move that heat efficiently. Remember free flow air registers through the ceiling to heat upstairs rooms? You can also use through-the-wall fans to move warm air into adjacent rooms. Put a register high in the wall of the stove room and another register in the same stud space with a fan low in the wall of the adjacent room.

    Perhaps ceiling fans would also dampen the impact of the variable fireplace temperatures on the radiant heating system. But the engineers should comment on this.

    Al

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