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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    maple ridge, bc
    Posts
    107
    Hi guys, after 25 years on the tools and one brief year teaching I'm going back to trade school. This time to teach full-time. Question: Could you boys tell me what you think makes an effective instructor and also the mistakes you've seen. I was pretty fortunate in that my instructors were all pretty good although a couple were outright sadistic. If I can help it the problems you've seen won't be repeated. Appreciate any help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    276
    -be organized (material handouts etc.)
    -do not try to bluff
    -keep the story telling to a minamum, and only tell stories that can be applied to the lesson.
    -keep looking for new information.

    good luck

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    276
    some where on this site there used to be a thread mistakes a instructor makes.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    4,970
    I agree to keep the stories to a minimum, and dont take long breaks. I see that too often at seminars, at what it costs and the time your taking off, your there to learn not take a bunch of breaks. I get a kick out of a lot of teachers just trying to look like they know a lot more then the students..... who cares they are there to learn not be feel that they are infearier to you.I agree with handouts on everything being a lot of guys will fall behind on a lot of things being said being they are too busy trying to copy what you might be showing them on the overhead projector before you put something else up( I hate that). I have always felt that making everyone do what ever you are showing them is better then having them watch someone else do it is better, I think it sinks in way better and promotes more confidence.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    7,321
    I once worked with a guy who was very talented. I was an apprentice and worked around him for almost four years. good guy, good heart, honest to a fault, not pushy or arrogant. In addition, he was a night instructor. After finishing my apprenticeship I started taking night classes and eventually wound up in his class. Even knowing him well and trying to help lighten the mood in the class, we just couldnt keep our eyes open. It wasnt that he didnt have a wealth of information it was that he was perfectly monotone and therefore tiresome to us. The point is, inject some energy into your classes, use anecdotes, remember why you are there and enjoy yourself, then the class will too.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    where the beer flows like wine
    Posts
    2,871
    I had a good instructor, well there was this time when we we're learning about motors and he gave us a cap to look at and pass around the students.....I got a mark in my index , he was a joker! at the end of the week he used to take us to a near by pub and drinks we;re on him, to the end of his life many of us called him or stoped by his house every now and then.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,579
    Originally posted by coolestacman
    some where on this site there used to be a thread mistakes a instructor makes.
    http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread.php?threadid=24982

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Stafford, Va. USA
    Posts
    213
    Hi Deer,
    (feel like I'm talking to my wife)
    Don't talk over their heads, use the simple words. The $3 words are fine for people with experience. I agree with everyone else about the war stories.
    Good luck,
    Allen

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    Miami, Fla. USA
    Posts
    417
    Never brag about how good you are at work.
    Never put down a fellow worker. EG. I had to fix so and so's problems.
    Always have more to cover than the time allows. You can always finish the following week.
    Always be prepared.
    If you make a mistake, correct it and move on. No instructor is beyond having a bad evening.

    Other than that, enjoy the ride. Students will teach you more about your short comings than you care to know.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    manitowoc wisconsin
    Posts
    4,943
    I think the best instructor I had would have been Ed Schriver.He was teaching rses's heat pump course.Ed was a refrigeration guru by all means.It was funny though,I needed a compressor for my personal use & traded him some labor for it.I looked at his job & could not hold the chuckle in.This guy was the best refer guy I have ever met,he was a problem solver for any large industrial application you could think of.The laugh was for his sheet metal work.I told him:Ed you are a refrigeration god but please do not do sheet metal sub it all out!He laughed a bit & got embarresed.I just wish I knew half of what he forgot over the years.
    Take your time & do it right!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    37

    HVAC Intructor

    Deer

    Make eye contact w/your students, this only occurs when your lesson plans and subject matter are short and brief
    Make sure you motivate them and keep them interested.
    Eye contact from you will let you know who is getting the subject matter and who is not.
    Make sure you have POI (Plan of Instruction for the entire course)
    Daily Lesson Plans each day and after each lesson what is your objective on that subject matter.
    Ex: each student after this lesson will learn…bla…bla…
    Again make sure your students are motivated and interested in your subject matter.
    Voice control-Raise and lower your voice (get excited over the subject matter)
    State your real life experiences. (Give them a war story once in a while)

    Example a simple Lesson plan
    Simple Refrigeration Cycle
    Compressor
    Condenser
    TXV
    Evaporator
    Goal of Lesson: End of lesson each student will know the 4 main components of a refrigeration cycle.

    P.S. Never read your lesson plan, you will lose eye contact and the class..
    Note: Which do you prefer, Your are in church the preacher, priest read from the bible and makes no eye contact w/the people, look around and see how many churchgoers are dozing, bored or sleeping. Or go to church and this priest /preacher give a great sermon w/max eye contact and tells you about his personal experiences.

    Good Luck on your new career.

    What counts is not necessarily the size of the dog in the fight - it's the size of the fight in the dog. - Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969)

    Enough Said…


    [Edited by jackmm1 on 05-25-2005 at 03:34 PM]

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Stafford, Va. USA
    Posts
    213
    Hi Deer,
    I think Chomper and JackMM1 are providing the best advice.
    Good Luck,
    Allen

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    400
    Show energy if your into it they will be to . also walk the room go to the back of the class while your talking . Be unpredictable . Pose tough question and then walk out of the room let them work it out . Put them in situations that are not totally comfortable for them like working with someone that they are not used to . Let them know when they make you angry there boss sure will . Hope this helps .
    is this really happening or not

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