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  1. #1

    basement dehumidifier system

    I'm looking to see what my best options would be for dehumidifying my finished basement. It's about 800 sqft of space, and is around 85% most of the year, and about 70% in the winter. I live in Rhode Island. It's heated with zoned oil burner with forced hot water. Some people have suggested i look santa fe classic. Part of the basement is not finished so i would like to keep the dehumidifier there or outside the house. My basement has 3 rooms, and i've had suggested that i just put vents in the walls and pull air from one room and push air into other so that it flows through all the rooms. I would like to keep the air around 45-50% year round. Thanks.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304
    Quote Originally Posted by eduda View Post
    I'm looking to see what my best options would be for dehumidifying my finished basement. It's about 800 sqft of space, and is around 85% most of the year, and about 70% in the winter. I live in Rhode Island. It's heated with zoned oil burner with forced hot water. Some people have suggested i look santa fe classic. Part of the basement is not finished so i would like to keep the dehumidifier there or outside the house. My basement has 3 rooms, and i've had suggested that i just put vents in the walls and pull air from one room and push air into other so that it flows through all the rooms. I would like to keep the air around 45-50% year round. Thanks.
    Are there any building issues which lead to the high humidity? If so it would be wasteful to use a machine to dehumidify, without first addressing those issues. Do you not believe the vent suggestion will deal with your problem?

    However I believe the Thermastor Santa Fe to be a very mature and efficient solution. I own a Santa Fe RX which is the same unit with extra sound deadening to be more suitable for space with people in it. Very satisfied with mine.

    Best of luck -- Pstu

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by pstu View Post
    Are there any building issues which lead to the high humidity? If so it would be wasteful to use a machine to dehumidify, without first addressing those issues. Do you not believe the vent suggestion will deal with your problem?
    No water issues, any cracks where professionally sealed. I haven't seen any water in the basement. Also, under the slab, it's sent via gravity to the street drain. I think the vent solution might work, as long as it creates air-flow.

    Thanks for the info about the RX.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
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    4,763
    Quote Originally Posted by eduda View Post
    No water issues, any cracks where professionally sealed. I haven't seen any water in the basement. Also, under the slab, it's sent via gravity to the street drain. I think the vent solution might work, as long as it creates air-flow.

    Thanks for the info about the RX.
    Ptsu is conveying a basic rule of building science, go to the root. Determine the cause before deciding upon cure or treatment as solution strategy. Running a dehumidifier is a treatment.

    Moisture is neither created or destroyed, it moves from areas of high concentrations to low, sometimes changing state depending on temperature. 70% rh in winter seems very high. Where is that moisture coming from? What is rh of rest of house?
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,638
    Quote Originally Posted by eduda View Post
    I'm looking to see what my best options would be for dehumidifying my finished basement. It's about 800 sqft of space, and is around 85% most of the year, and about 70% in the winter. I live in Rhode Island. It's heated with zoned oil burner with forced hot water. Some people have suggested i look santa fe classic. Part of the basement is not finished so i would like to keep the dehumidifier there or outside the house. My basement has 3 rooms, and i've had suggested that i just put vents in the walls and pull air from one room and push air into other so that it flows through all the rooms. I would like to keep the air around 45-50% year round. Thanks.
    The Ultra-Aire/Santa Fe line of larger, more efficient, durable dehumidifiers will fix summer moisture problems.
    Winter moisture problems are usually a sign of insufficient amounts of fresh air to purge indoor pollutants and renew oxygen. Homes should have a minimum of an air change in 5-6 hours when occupied. In most homes, this is 60-90 cfm of fresh dry air. Occupants generate about .5 lbs. per hour per person of moisture from occupan from breathing and activities. Winter outside air is dry because of low dew points. As the fresh dry air moves through the home, occupants moisture is removed, keeping the home plenty dry. If you have high occupancy numbers, fish tanks, or other sources more dry air may be needed. More fresh air is usually recommeded as the best method of winter moisture control.
    The warmer weather seasons are the opposite problem. You still need the fresh air to purge indoor pollutants/renew oxygen but during wet weather, the fresh air contains (+55^F dew point) excess moisture. Because of the cooler basement temperatures, the inside humidity should be <55%RH to avoid must odors from mold. The a/c will remove most of the moisture during extreme heat but a good dehumidifier is needed to maintain <55%RH throughout the home.
    My suggestion is to use the whole house dehumidifier with a fresh air inlet to provide fresh air whenever the home is occupied. Set the dehumidifier at 50%RH. Introduce enough fresh air to maintain 35-40%RH during the cold weather during the cold weather. During the warmer seasons, introduce 70-90 cfm of fresh air when the home occupied and maintain 50%RH throughout the home or just the basement. Ideal comfort, odor free, and the best indoor air quality.
    Check my past posts for more specific basment info or thermastor .com for info
    Regards tb
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by tedkidd View Post
    Moisture is neither created or destroyed, it moves from areas of high concentrations to low, sometimes changing state depending on temperature. 70% rh in winter seems very high. Where is that moisture coming from? What is rh of rest of house?
    I wrote the wrong rh for winter. In the winter it's actually now about 50% rh in the winter. A few years ago, when I had a few leaks in the walls, which are now fixed, it was > 70% rh.

    The rest of the house (ranch) ranges about 30% to 40% rh in the winter.

    Thanks.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,638
    Quote Originally Posted by eduda View Post
    I wrote the wrong rh for winter. In the winter it's actually now about 50% rh in the winter. A few years ago, when I had a few leaks in the walls, which are now fixed, it was > 70% rh.

    The rest of the house (ranch) ranges about 30% to 40% rh in the winter.

    Thanks.
    Good to here! If you have 3+ occupants, no additional fresh air needed for the winter. During warm weather, the infiltration of fresh air slows and you should consider mechanical fresh air when occupied for ideal IAQ. Certainly a ducted Santa Fe dehumidifier in the basement is a minimum.
    Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

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