Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Garland,Tx
    Posts
    5
    My house is a Fox and Jacobs built in 78. I have, probably the original, Lennox a/c unit with the air handler over the shower. It drips. Cold water. In the shower. I know the drain line is clogged. I can feel standing water in the line at the access point just off the air handler. I have tried to snake it with a sewer snake, piece of steel wire, fish tape, blowing air through hose. What else can I try?
    The snakes and fish tape wont make it around the 90 bends.
    It comes out of the handler about 6 in then 90's, about 6 inches more then 90's down, from there I dont know where it goes.

    I was thinking of trying drano or lots of water pressure.

  2. #2
    Try a shop-vac where the drain is outside by the condencer

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Garland,Tx
    Posts
    5
    do all a/c drain outside the house?
    the one behind my condenser goes up into the attic but is not the same line that drips.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Garland,Tx
    Posts
    5
    duh! never mind the last question, I looked again outside and now realize what I am looking at. I am gonna try vacuum now.

  5. #5
    Made a lot of money with a 20.00 shop-vac, let me know..

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Garland,Tx
    Posts
    5
    my little one did not work. I can try the big one. I have tried snaking it again from both sides.

  7. #7
    if there is a safety pan under the air handler plug the drain with a rag so the vac will pull from the air handler and not the safety pan...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Garland,Tx
    Posts
    5
    Below is the drain above the shower. I have tried snaking and vaccuming. You can see the opening on the top of the drain pipe and the back up where it drips to the shower. you are saying I should put a rag where?


    below is the drain outside which I have tried snaking and vaccuming.


    the problem is between the opening in the pipe by air handler and outside.

  9. #9
    you can e-mail me at gomobileairyahoo.com...

    [Edited by lusker on 05-15-2005 at 04:56 PM]

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,302
    A Fox & Jacobs house, eh? That's what I got. Not the same kind of a/c gear, though. Yours looks like a First Company air handler DX coil with electric heat.

    The elbow you see poking outside the house may or may not be the condensate drain termination. Reason I say "may not" is because it could also be where the hot water heater safety relief valve discharges. So if you stuck your shop vac there, you're just sucking at a pipe full of air.

    Being that your drain line at the air handler and appears to be made of copper, this is no easy fix. You could cut it loose at the air handler and then blow or suck all the crap out of the pipe, but then you gotta find a way to re-attach that pipe to the air handler once you clear the clog. And then check to be sure the drain really is clear and drains correctly. And that your new connection to the air handler also doesn't leak.

    And it looks like really tight quarters around there.

    Nix the Drain-o and snake. Waste of time and if you end up calling a plumber or HVAC tech, neither one likes those harsh chemical drain openers splashing on them when they go to clear the clog.
    • Electricity makes refrigeration happen.
    • Refrigeration makes the HVAC psychrometric process happen.
    • HVAC pyschrometrics is what makes indoor human comfort happen...IF the ducts AND the building envelope cooperate.


    A building is NOT beautiful unless it is also comfortable.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    6

    Talking

    my advice would be to cut the pipe near the coil, leaving about 4 inches straight pipe on either side. Go get a rubber hose and clamps that would fit over the pipe to reattach. Blow out the drain line to the outside. Run a wire or whatever into the coil to see if there is crud blocking the exit. With as old a unit as you have could be a rusted drain pan---not fun.
    Hope this helps!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    The drain coming out by the condensor is probably the emergency drain line or the line from the pressure relief for the hot water heater. The primary drain line likely terminates to the drain for the bathtub, or other drain, in the bathroom.

    Codes and building practices have always been inconsistant from town to town in the DFW area, but terminating the primary drain line for the AC to outside was/is almost never done exept in retrofit installations where it went to a french pit.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    706

    Post t

    i would cut the primary drain line at the air handler. get a piece of rubber tubing that fits snuggly and use stainless hose clamps to secure. need to blow the drain line from inside to outside. once you locate the end of the piping, & it being being blown clean, hook up a shop vac at the outside end and turn on. get some nylon string and feed it in to the pipe at the a/h. vacuum should suck it all the way to the outside. make a small knot @ the a/h,small enough to go through piping & fittings. be sure to tie another string to the one you are gonna pull out. so if it gets stuck, you can pull it back. hopefully they don't pipe your drain in the main house drain or vent pipe. i would call a quality hvac company to solve this problem. worst case, run new drain lines and put a line cover over them!

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