Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 48
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    12
    My father-in-law would like a DIY home central heat air repair book with good illustrations, can some one please recommend a title?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Not a book title, but have location in mind...

    TECH SCHOOL!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    12
    I believe I asked for a book title? Your useless response was unneeded and in no way effectively answered my question. MY father-in-law is a Vietnam veteran who has taught himself all forms of repair including installing ductwork and central units by himself. The reason I asked for a book title is because he would like to learn more of central units since he maintains all of his rental properties himself and does not want to pay grossly inflated repair fees.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Toledo, Ohio, United States
    Posts
    12,896
    Time life makes soem books as well as the public library. However why do you want to insult us by saying "our grossly infalted service fees" , maybe he should pick up a couple of books on surgery and he could save you some money on in future surgery you may need.

    Maybe denistry too.

    I have no problem with someone who wants to maintain their own equipment, but we have spent years and invested thousands of dollars in tools ans training and hardly think our service rates are grossly inflated, we earned them.

    Also I too am a vietman vet but that doesn't even get me a happy meal at mickey d's.

    Semper Fi.
    No Heat No Cool You need Action Fast

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Las Vegas
    Posts
    755
    You can try this site or Amazon.com gives good descriptions

    http://www.books4hvac.com/default.aspx


    Of course would still recommend a couple of training courses at a local college just for good measure, Books can only give some Ideas and buying all the tools to do the job right is not really cheaper then having a Tech come out and fix it right the first time even if the price seems a little steep.
    Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat. (President Theodore Roosevelt)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,597
    try "fear and loathing in las vegas" by hunter s. thompson.

    lots of wacky ideas in there.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    I learned most about what I do by watching re-runs of "The Red Green Show". I'd start there.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    12
    Thank you "retired btc" and "twilli3967" for your constructive replies. I have looked at the time life books, but they seem to be more geared to the beginner.

    twilli3967 - I understand where you are coming from as far defending your rates as I am Computer service business owner. However, where we live most companies charge $100.00 just to come out, then whatever the service fee is, so to me that is grossly inflated.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    emerald city, sc
    Posts
    1,469
    Originally posted by 829
    However, where we live most companies charge $100.00 just to come out, then whatever the service fee is, so to me that is grossly inflated.


    you are right, since the average cost to the company for that service call is $90, how dare they try to make $10 in profit. of course you can find one who will come out for $19.95, but they have to make up the difference somewhere. ask yourself, which one would you rather do business with. as for me, i'll take the 100 dollar one, at least i know the tech's not under pressure to sell me something.
    i wanted to put a picture here

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    North St Paul MN
    Posts
    858
    Try a community college or vo-tech that teaches HVAC. They usually have a bookstore. But be prepared to spend alot. Last book I bought was a small book about low pressure boilers--$55.00. Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Technology--$100.00.
    I'd rather have a bottle in front of me, than a frontal lobotomy.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    San Luis Obispo County, CA
    Posts
    215
    Now you know if he is serious about this, he will have to get at least an EPA class 2 certification. Class 2 will allow him to work on most residential systems.
    Next he is going to need to buy a freon recovery machine and tank, and register that with the EPA
    Then he will need a good vacuum pump to pump down the system after repair
    Good air/acetylene torch for brazing and tanks.
    He will need a set of manifold gauges
    At least one, but should have 2 digital themometers
    Good clamp on Amp gauge
    multi-meter

    He can expect to spend at least $1,200 but more likely a minimum of $2,000 just to get started. Couple that with the books and tech manuals he will need, and its a fair sum.

    If he wants to tackle some of the maintenance himself, he can change filters every month, Keep the outside condensors clean and free of leaves and grass clippings. And just pay attention to how all the units are working.

    If he does this, he may head off a serious problem, Without all the technicalities needed to open the refrigerant system.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    San Luis Obispo County, CA
    Posts
    215
    Now you know if he is serious about this, he will have to get at least an EPA class 2 certification. Class 2 will allow him to work on most residential systems.
    Next he is going to need to buy a freon recovery machine and tank, and register that with the EPA
    Then he will need a good vacuum pump to pump down the system after repair
    Good air/acetylene torch for brazing and tanks.
    He will need a set of manifold gauges
    At least one, but should have 2 digital themometers
    Good clamp on Amp gauge
    multi-meter
    Freon leak detector

    He can expect to spend at least $1,200 but more likely a minimum of $2,000 just to get started. Couple that with the books and tech manuals he will need, and its a fair sum.

    If he wants to tackle some of the maintenance himself, he can change filters every month, Keep the outside condensors clean and free of leaves and grass clippings. And just pay attention to how all the units are working.

    If he does this, he may head off a serious problem, Without all the technicalities needed to open the refrigerant system.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    12
    you are right, since the average cost to the company for that service call is $90, how dare they try to make $10 in profit. of course you can find one who will come out for $19.95, but they have to make up the difference somewhere. ask yourself, which one would you rather do business with. as for me, i'll take the 100 dollar one, at least i know the tech's not under pressure to sell me something.
    That is the same as me saying when I send a guy out, I charge $100.00. I would assume you mean a company that does not charge exorbited prices are lacking in knowledge, thieves or high-pressured to sell? I am almost certain, but not 100% that my technicians spend as much if not more time in school as a HVAC tech. I do not charge near as much for service calls for service as any of my competitors, because we make up for it in volume. I do not understand why companies need to have high prices to make money. I am sure they are making more than $10.00 profit.

    He is not looking to replace the freon (as last I thought you had to have EPA cert to even buy the stuff,) he wants to be able to maintain more than filters. I looked over the PCB on my unit and spoted a blown fuse while the repair man that was sent to get my unit working scratched his head, so I am not sure that other than checking load and wiring there is a whole lot to it before a person would need a cert. Please, if you having anything to say other than the topic at hand, please be an adult and move on.


    Now back to the point at hand, book titles?

    [Edited by 829 on 05-16-2005 at 01:33 AM]

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event