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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    483
    Originally posted by James 3528
    Originally posted by jdenyer
    Easy on the Chlordane guys. This stuff hangs around for decades after being used, no need to reapply it. This is one of the reasons Chlordane was so popular. This stuff is proven to cause blood cancers ie leukemia in people, one of the main reasons it was pulled from the market. The replacement is Ortho-Klor made by Ortho, and contains the active ingredient Bifenthrin. Ortho-Klor works just as well as Clordane for ants and termites. And no I'm not a "green". If you do use Chlordane make sure you wear protective gear. This is some really nasty stuff.


    Hard time convincing me it works as good as chlordane and I wasn't drinking it so cancer was not a concern.

    The EPA has killed other good stuff. Like R22
    Don't get me wrong James, If used with protective clothing Chlordane can be used safely. I wasn't trying to wrinkle any feathers here, just wanted those that are still using the stuff to be careful. My father passed away in 1991 after battling leukemia for 11 years. He worked with chlordane at a local feed store where he grew up. He didn't drink it either, just handled 50# sacks on a daily basis. My father getting leukemia could have also been a coincidence too, as there is no way to tell how he got it. Apparently the stuff can get into your body through your skin. I have actually used Ortho-Klor for carpenter ants, and have found that it works great. One time application, no more ants for over 3 years now. The key to using Ortho-Klor is to saturate the soil around the are you want to keep the ants away from. Ortho-Klor stays active in soil for up to 10 years. And if you still have chlordane I believe you can legally use it until it's gone. They just can't manufacture or import anymore in the U.S. I will agree with you James that the EPA has taken away a lot of the things that work great.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Coastal Georgia
    Posts
    34,902
    Originally posted by Steve Wiggins


    These ants were attracted by the crankcase heater. If a magnetic field were the attractant there would be ants all over other components. Think about it. Contacts points are warm. Crankcase heaters are warm. Ants like heat. It's as simple as that.

    No, its not that simple Steve. Ants navigate on the earth's magnetic field and are highly sensitive to magnetism. There are plenty of ants in condensing units that don't have crank case heaters.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Waco, Texas, USA
    Posts
    6,153
    Yes there are ants in units without crankcase heaters but only in the heat producing contactors......no where else.

    If it were magnetism tv and stereo speakers would be full of them.
    "And remember my sentimental friend......that a heart is not judged by how much you love, but by how much you are loved by others" - Wizard of Oz.

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Coastal Georgia
    Posts
    34,902
    Yes they would be. If your TV and stereo were in your yard on the ground and perhaps were not DC. There is also a difference between a magnet and a electromagnetic field.

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    1,634
    This might be a dumb question as I normally only deal with low voltage (<120vAC/DC), but why do they use un-sealed/unenclosed contactors on condensers? heat disspiation issues? It seems many of the contactor problems/failures could be prevented if fully-enclosed contactors were used. I've noticed that most fan/blower relays in smaller AHUs are sealed and I can't remember any large # of failure swith them.

    Hmm.. maybe I should patent it...

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    3,400
    Originally posted by tpa-fl
    This might be a dumb question as I normally only deal with low voltage (<120vAC/DC), but why do they use un-sealed/unenclosed contactors on condensers? heat disspiation issues? It seems many of the contactor problems/failures could be prevented if fully-enclosed contactors were used. I've noticed that most fan/blower relays in smaller AHUs are sealed and I can't remember any large # of failure swith them.

    Hmm.. maybe I should patent it...
    It's about the money.

    They could use explosion-proof, oversized contactors and hardly ever have a failure, but their competitors would underbid.

    Save a buck on a unit.
    Make a million units.
    (I was gonna say "You do the math.", but I'll do it for you, since I've got a calculator handy)

    Make a million bucks.



    [Edited by bwal2 on 05-19-2005 at 06:27 AM]

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    1,634
    Hmm... different industry, different mindset, I guess. I'm coming from the broadcast & live performance industry where reliability is worth its weight in gold and word-of-mouth about bad relability spreads like wildfire. Then again, when you're charging up to $100,000 per SECOND (ex: superbowl adverts), we'll gladly pay for anything which enhances reliability. Hmm.. I'll have to look into swapping out the contactors on the transmitter sites.. So far, no probs, but avoiding probs is better than repairing probs.

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