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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    977
    I just got "Tecumseh Hermetic Service Handbook" couple days ago. Free for the askin'
    Page 2:
    "Oil and refrigerant can spray out of the compressor if one of the terminal pins is ejected from the hermetic terminal. This 'terminal venting' can occur as a result of a ground fault (aka short circuit) in the compressor. The oil and refrigerant spray from terminal venting can be ignited by electricity and produce flames that can lead to serious burns or death."
    Page 3 has a pic of a hermetic terminal with a pin blown out, from a short.

    Does this help/apply?

    And, is the compressor missing any pins?
    Seems that would tell you there was a short that your meter missed.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    3,400
    Originally posted by hvacguy1075
    Are you sure the plastic terminal cover was put there to stop flying debris ?
    Nope.
    I am not sure.

    Maybe they are just "child safety" covers to keep your little fingers out.
    Or decoration.
    Or just a handy place to put a wiring diagram.

    Leave 'em off, if you like.
    Hacks do it all the time.

    Check with the compressor manufacturers.
    I am sure they are optional.
    -NOT

    Originally posted by RoBoTeq
    hell, metal ones will be blown off when those fuselites blow.
    Not necessarily so.
    I've seen plenty of plastic ones still in place.
    I once was greeted with dirty oil, under pressure, from a little window unit sitting in the back of a truck. It had not been plugged in for two days. I decided to ohm it out, based on the customer's description.
    The fusite terminals had blown, and the little plastic cover was still in place, gasket, refrigerant, oil, & all.
    When I popped the cover, out it came.

    The point is, they were put on there for a reason.
    Put them back on before starting the compressor.
    If you need to take voltage readings, while starting or running, do it on the other end of the compressor wires.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    3,400
    Originally posted by sprintmj19
    I just got "Tecumseh Hermetic Service Handbook" couple days ago. Free for the askin'
    Page 2:
    "Oil and refrigerant can spray out of the compressor if one of the terminal pins is ejected from the hermetic terminal. This 'terminal venting' can occur as a result of a ground fault (aka short circuit) in the compressor. The oil and refrigerant spray from terminal venting can be ignited by electricity and produce flames that can lead to serious burns or death."
    Page 3 has a pic of a hermetic terminal with a pin blown out, from a short.

    Does this help/apply?

    And, is the compressor missing any pins?
    Seems that would tell you there was a short that your meter missed.
    Talk about the obvious.

    Thanks for citing Tecumseh's literature.
    I knew I had read it somewhere.

    That ought to wrap up this thread.

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,923
    I guess how well those dust/moisture covers stay on depends more on the holding clip. I know there are a lot of things we are supposed to do for safety, but how many of them do we really do? I can't ever remember seeing any tech put that cover back on until he was ready to button things up.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  5. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    37725, work @ 37760
    Posts
    412
    Can cool discharge line burn you?

  6. #32
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    11,967
    I am sorry guys, maybe I am wrong here.... Was my previous post "jumping on the boss" incorrect???

    I have been working both ends of the stick for a couple of months and getting pretty damn grouchy too. I am sure most of you have noticed. Sorry, just trying to keep up.

    Having coffee this morning it just hit me that both of them should have known not to jump out the safety on that compressor or was it OK?

    How many of you out there have not jumped an external overload to crank one up? Let the first sinner cast the first stone and all of that stuff....

    I certainly know I have done it dozens of times and I apologize for my previous post.

    Just have never been standing in front of one that tried to be Neil Armstrong.

    Sorry for my previous attitude Grodan1






    [Edited by lusker on 05-14-2005 at 11:16 AM]

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    65
    My meter is a fluke 16 multimeter.Is this good enough, and if so, what setting should it be set to.I just turn it to ohms and do the darn thing.

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    65
    Hey lusker.My first thought was you were a ****.But then I let it go as not a clear indication of your character.But your last post gave a good picture of it and thanks for your last post.I no longer think you're a ****.

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    443
    I doubt your meter was the problem. A while back one of my instructors brought in a blower motor off the chiller for us to troubleshoot. He knew it was bad, but coulden't find the problem. It heated up fast and made a light clicking noise. We spent two days, and several calls to motor winding shop with no answers. Finaly with the meter hooked up and turning the motor slowly by hand the short showed up. The winding was starting to break down and it only showed up in one spot. Turn the shaft 2 degrees and it was ok again. Most likely your compressor motor was the same way. With 360 degrees what are the odds of the compressor motor stopping in just the right position in that situation?

  10. #36
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    11,967
    Originally posted by grodan1
    Hey lusker.My first thought was you were a ****.But then I let it go as not a clear indication of your character.But your last post gave a good picture of it and thanks for your last post.I no longer think you're a ****.
    No... your first impression was correct... I am an a$$....but not all the time, sorry dude...

    What I would really like to know is what made your compressor become a rocket case.

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    3,400
    Originally posted by grodan1
    My meter is a fluke 16 multimeter.Is this good enough, and if so, what setting should it be set to.I just turn it to ohms and do the darn thing.
    The Fluke 16 is very nice autoranging instrument.
    It only has one setting for reading resistance.
    It will automatically measure up to 40 megohms.
    That should be high enough to detect a short to ground, if it is pre-existing.

    I don't think you killed the compressor.
    You are an innocent bystander, holding a smoking gun.


  12. #38
    you checked for ground to the suction line?... still being relatively new to the field, i would like to know if this is ok, i check for ground against the unit, or bare metal inside the unit.

    if i am wrong , someone correct, me, but i thought it had to be a known grounded source, and a lineset is or is not grounded???

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Gone
    Posts
    5,340
    You check for a grounded leg by placing one lead against the compressor casing wherever you can get bare metal such as the copper line, and the other lead to one of the legs. You want to test at the “source” and forget about the rest of the unit during this procedure.

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