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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Posts
    996
    Been using copper tubing in Canada for the past 15 years, had no problems at all. 2lb pressure with regulators at the appliances. 1/2 od tubing for main line.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    1,734
    I am not wild about it, but here in Austin, TX all
    codes allow flex from the shut off, into the cabinet
    all the way to the gas valve in the ah.

    I see black pipe run all the way only about 2% of the
    time, and I can not remember the last time I saw
    a drip leg. When I replace units, I put a drip leg
    in, with pipe dope (no tef tape), and put a rubber
    gromet in the ah cabinet.

    Sometimes I run black pipe all the way, some times
    I do not. Heck recently I was in a $5 mil home
    and all the piping was copper, never seen that before.
    I do believe they were on lp gas though. This
    house had 9 Rheem units, and every room had a
    individual zone. I did not like it because unit
    would turn on to cool one room, and the bypass damper
    would open almost all the way, such a waste.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    most dope is only good as a lubricant for well made threads.
    I have used & specified Loctite for all threaded joints for 35y, including for 2500psig hydraulics -- just different product for hyd -- the only time I had leaks was when I used straight thread dies (elec) by accident -- got to replace all of that -- my house.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    11,874
    In Canada. Where people can't own guns,right? What about the flaking action that happens inside the tubing. Dosen't that bother you?I can't think of one location in the USA that copper tubing is ok to use.If I'm not mistaken ,copper tubing is a whole lot thinner walled also.Speaking for myself, even if it were leagle here I wouldn't use it.I've seen more than one flare break ,had nails penatrate, and don't forget the kink factor ,you on the other hand can use it for 15 more years.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    3,400
    I agree, copper is not the best choice.
    However, it is legal in many areas.
    So is plastic.
    Go figger.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    11,874
    I wonder whose insurance company foots the bill when a building burns down due to using inferior materials? I know I won't use it.As a licensed state contractor in Texas we're not even supposed to run any kind of plumbing.If I'm not mistaken at one time it was ok to run 6' but that changed,guys if I'm wrong correct me. Just seems like a law suit in the making . Don't know about anybody else but my rates go up EVERY year, and I've never had a claim. I couldn't sleep knowing there was copper tubing being used for a supply line. But I can only speak for myself.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    3,112
    The sulfides in natural gas that caused flicking have been almost completely eliminated. Copper is okay to use. Flacking is not an issue. As for using flex lines, read the information label attatched to the flex line. Regarless of what you local code allows, the gas line manufacturer prohibits the installation of flex through the cabinet. Instead of coming here and asking questions, why not research your own answers. This results in benefits to you twofold; First, you learn how to find you own answers and don't have to depend on maybe getting the incorrect information and second, when you do the research you retain the information better.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    11,874
    ALMOST, but not completely. What ever lights your pilot. I
    won't use it, only have it replaced. Let your conscience be your guide. Evidently, my customer's well being means more to me than you. Just my thoughts. And this will be the end of my comments on this subject.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    3,112
    Get over yourself. If it's approved for use in the National Fuel Gas Code, that should be good enough.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Posts
    996
    there must be a million propane instalations with copper tubing, how come it is ok for propane which in my open is way more explosive due to it's density than gas, but it is no good for nat. gas? Go figure. We have not seen any problem with flaking in nat. gas. I will say that it must be installed according to code. As far as black pipe, the crap fittings and pipe we have to work with these days are a nightmare. Pin holes, cracks, and split pipe seams are quite common these days. I would never go back to running black pipe except on commercial applications, just too much **** pipe out there.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    322
    Originally posted by troyorr
    As for using flex lines, read the information label attatched to the flex line. Regarless of what you local code allows, the gas line manufacturer prohibits the installation of flex through the cabinet. Instead of coming here and asking questions, why not research your own answers. This results in benefits to you twofold; First, you learn how to find you own answers and don't have to depend on maybe getting the incorrect information and second, when you do the research you retain the information better.
    Yeah, you get some conflicting info here but I value the advice as much as the manufacturer labels. I bought a hedge trimmer a while back that said don't use it above 5 feet. That's just lawyer crap. I've looked at the labels on flexible gas lines and they say you can't ever reuse the pipe or the fittings on either end of the flex line. Now is that there for geniune safety reasons or to sell more parts?

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    706

    Angry g

    in tampa, there are still plenty of units that have 1/2" copper tubing from the shut-off, going directly to the gas valve. you can flex tubing just about anywhere. saw a house being built last week, brought black pipe in to attic space and made a multi-port manifold. then flex-lined everything out from there! went to inspection board out front, and sure enough it was passed on its rough-in stage. goes to show codes can be totally different from place to place. homeowners that have concerns, need to consult w/ an outside agent to make sure their home is being built w/ their concerns in mind!

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    every time one installs a fastener or connector, it is stressed, perhaps even gaulded. because of this, it is quite difficult to predict or measure just how well a remade connection was done.

    the connectors on flex tubing are not as heavy as with rigid pipe, so are susceptable to less abuse.

    I have reused many flex pipes for a cooking range and for a gas fired clothes dryer -- several times, but then, I had no extra liability.
    As a contractor, if you violate a device manufacturer's instructions, you void any listing by an agency like UL, and you will have no defense in a law suit, and no insurance coverage --




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