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Thread: Ruud with leaks

  1. #1
    I have an apartment building with 4 2ton Ruud 10 seer units.
    I had a friend cleaned them and noticed that the service valves had silicone on the service valve covers..Can the valves be replaced or does the unit have to be replaced?Its 10 years old and i'm trying to keep from replacing it...It's the valve with the hex head...

  2. #2
    yep service valves can be replaced
    but can be costly all the freon needs to removed
    then replace valves and fliter dryer. pump down and charged with freon
    i would cheek inside coils first they are now for haveing leaks

  3. #3

    Ruud with leaks

    the inside unit was replace within 5 years..I just replaced
    a unit because of the valves leaking,but it was 23 years old.The unit that is leaking now is about 10 or 11 years old.The A/C guy we had then put in a Janitrol(Goodman),we cleaned it Thursday also..

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Niantic, Illinois
    Posts
    545
    Certain service valves can have the o-rings changed to fix the leak. This still doesn't get you off the hook for recovering the refrigerant, drier, vac down, and recharge though. Many times I have found leaky schrader valves as the leaking culprit, a nice little tool is available to professionals that allow us to change schrader valves without losing refrigerant, a leak search is in order here as silicone around the valves is an indication of a leak, but not a guarantee. Pin point the leak, then fix it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Suppy NC
    Posts
    4,513
    if the valves are leaking then have them replaced
    if they are not leaking leave them alone till they do
    ten year old unit isnt worth the expense of new valves
    and you may be opening up more problems with the unit

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    You'll be spending alot more in the near future if you dont replace the units now, the next time it will be all of it (indoor and out). The units built after January 2006, will all be 13 SEER.

    Many apartments are buying them now to postpone upgrading for another 10-15 years. The current 10 SEER units will still match your indoor units. 13 SEER wont.

    To answer your question, yes the valves can be replaced.

  7. #7

    Ruud with leaks

    I replaced one condenser unit for apartment A Thursday due to the service valves leaking,now i have another unit on its way out for apartment B..tenent complains of it icing up..the gauge readings are within range and coils are clean because a friend washed them for me..went over today and my friend put the gauges on,normal readings..sometimes it ices up and sometimes it doesnt..also noticed compresser is cold,isn't it supposed to be hot when in operation?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    Umm, if the service valve is leaking, not the service port, why not just seal the leak with some leak lock on the threads of the cap?

    It seems to me to be a completely unnecessary expense to replace one.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,943
    I agree. I have filled the service valve with silicone, epoxy or whatever sealant I have handy and then screwed the cap back on to stop valve leaks. Most valve leaks are from overheated brazing of the lines when installed. Most valve caps have never been properly tightened to seal the valve.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    Ick, I hate when people fill up the whole top of the thing with silicon or something! :P
    I use that nasty smelling blue leak lock stuff on the threads in case I actually have to use the valve down the road, like if we change the unit out.
    I like closing the service valves, especially the suction line one, before hauling an old unit out of the landscaping or loading it up in my van, to prevent oil spills.

    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,943
    I don't like doing it either, but once I have determined the next step is to replace the valve I figure it no longer matters.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Coastal Georgia
    Posts
    34,902
    I had my first Rheem suction valve strip and fail to open yesterday on a new start up. I used a easy out to get it open and left the easy out in the unit.

    Looking down in the valve from the top it just did not look like it was machined right.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    3,400
    Originally posted by mark beiser
    Umm, if the service valve is leaking, not the service port, why not just seal the leak with some leak lock on the threads of the cap?

    It seems to me to be a completely unnecessary expense to replace one.
    Wouldn't the refrigerant bubble through the leak-lock before it sets up?

    I would think you would still have a leak, although smaller.

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