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Thread: HVAC Air Filter

  1. #14
    Originally posted by Jax
    The single most often cause of shortenrd equipment life is poor air filtering, either too restrictive or allowing unfiltered air to pass.
    The filter is not there to clean the air in your house, it is there to protect you equipment. There is nothing better or cheaper than throw away Fiberglas filters in a good sealed mount, and changed regularly.
    Jax



    Are you kidding me? Filtration is not designed only to protect equipment. It's designed to remove particulate from the air occupants breathe as well.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    626
    Unfortunately tests in real homes, with sophisticated laser particle counters, have shown even HEPA filters in forced air systems have little effect on the particle count in homes. I agree with Jax--the Original intent of a filter in a forced air system is to keep the equipment clean. Trying to increase revenues has turned the furnace filter into "clean the air in the home". Science does not support that claim.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Chilly, the filter is to protect the equipment. Other IAQ products such as HEPA, UV, Spaceguards (and the like) are for the comfort of the individuals. As long as the system is designed with these in mind, they can be added. All of these IAQ products add to the workload of the equipment as they stand.

    So yes your right, but the standard factory filter and replacement fiberglass ones are to protect the equipment provided they are maintained.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Decatur, Alabama
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    5
    As a consumer and not a HVAC professional I can honestly say that I have enjoyed and been educated by the discussions - and thank you guys for being so candid. I wish that a professional had been as candid with me many years ago when I was buying equipment. As a purchaser, I thought the filter was specifically to keep the dust and other fine crap under control. If someone had told me that the most important job for the filter was to protect my $4500 investment rather than to keep my wife's furniture dusting schedule to a minimum, I would more likely have paid more attention to regular filter changing/cleaning. You see, as a guy, I more "cheap" than I am "clean"!

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    157
    Based on my own system, I recommend using the standard disposable fiters, unless the homeowner has a medical condition that may require extra air filtering. I looked inside my plenum and it was clean {30 year old system}. The only thing I do is replace the filters when they get slightly dusty. The dirtiest part is right at the registars where a person is able to kick things in. Also, when the home is clean, {especially the floors}, the ductwork is usually clean. When the home is dirty, the duct is dirty. Having said that, if a person wants something better and more expensive, that can provide piece of mind to the homeowner.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    626
    Doc--how do spaceguard, HEPA, and UV improve comfort?

  7. #20
    By killing airborne pathogens and the like, the occupants are more comfortable and healthier.

  8. #21
    Originally posted by docholiday
    Chilly, the filter is to protect the equipment. Other IAQ products such as HEPA, UV, Spaceguards (and the like) are for the comfort of the individuals. As long as the system is designed with these in mind, they can be added. All of these IAQ products add to the workload of the equipment as they stand.

    So yes your right, but the standard factory filter and replacement fiberglass ones are to protect the equipment provided they are maintained.




    If a 5" Honeywell media filter is there only to protect the equipment, how can they(Honeywell) claim that 80% of breathable particulate and microbes are removed by that particular filter?

    I'm not buying it. There's an old saying...."Buy a filter or be a filter"

  9. #22
    Oh OK.
    I misunderstood. I thought that the poster was asserting that ALL filters were there to protect equipment. My bad.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    midwest
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    I'm glad to hear chillbilly's comments. I recently built a 2-filter R/A drop for my furnace as an experiment, am using either 1 pleated or two of the standard type. Don't trust using one of each as it may cut down air flow more than is acceptable.

    Will try using one untreated regular filter as a prefilter and spraying the second with endust or something in an attempt to increase its efficiency....those disposable "walmart" filters do okay stopping dirt the size of ping pong balls, but much smaller than that they pretty well suck.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
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    Originally posted by chillbilly
    Glad you were able to come up with a reasonable solution.

    FYI
    My information on device pressure loss comes from manual D and presumes a clean filter.
    It shows .03 as the minimum value that is used, unless otherwise stated by the manufacturer.

    Also, a pre-filter is quite common in many systems.
    There is absolutely nothing wrong with using 2 filters as long as the system is designed for 2 filter use and has been correctly sized.

    [Edited by chillbilly on 05-08-2005 at 11:59 AM]
    Can you point to to where in Man. D it shows .03 as a minimum value,all I can find with a PD stated is section2-4,where it states filters that come with the unit can is .10 (wnhen clean),but a more recise number shuold be used.

    As you know the filter PD is deducted from the ESP to determine ASP,so it needs to be accurate,where a mistake in TEL of 5 or 10% is not as critical.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
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    The wet coil,is about a merv 5 or6 filter,so I'd get a higher merv to protect the equipment,and the air you breathe.

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    626
    Originally posted by chillbilly
    By killing airborne pathogens and the like, the occupants are more comfortable and healthier.
    Problem is there is no scientific evidence to show they do that--So again, how do they improve comfort? Or for that matter, IAQ?

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