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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    NE PA
    Posts
    698
    Given the vast wealth of knowledge on this forum, I am looking for some feedback on ClimateMaster. I was considering an installation with a ClimateMaster ground source unit. I posted earlier on this and got a positive comment about ClimateMaster. Since I have heard some other tales of problems with condensate tray rot through and heat exchanger leakage. I do not want a career in follow-up calls on a unit that is already unusual (ground source) due to an unreliable product.

    Prelim research on ClimateMaster looked good, but of course first looks can be deceiving.

    Anybody with some experience, good or bad ? Let's hear about it please.

    paul

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    428

    Thumbs up

    I have installed and service many of the Climate Master water to air systems and give them two thumbs up, the rot and heat exchanger leakage you speak of may have to do with lack of PROPER maintenance, I have had very little problems with these system, proper installation and maintenance is the key as with any system.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Churubusco, In.
    Posts
    17

    Cool

    As a contractor, I too searched the geothermal market for the best unit I could recommend and install for my customers.
    I finally narrowed it down to ClimateMaster. Have been installing them for 4 years now with No problems. Like the previous poster stated, IT all depends on the installation and maintance of the unit. If you are installing a open loop, make sure they install a filter/screen on the water inlet and clean it regularly. Happy heating/cooling

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    1,634
    Can anyone comment on the energy efficiency of these systems? I'm just curious, but with the heat capacity of water, I'd assume they're vastly more efficient than the typical air:air DX condensers.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Ft.Worth,Tx
    Posts
    4,581
    Well on then scale I would list Climatemaster to be at the top..

    Climatemaster
    Commandaire/Trane
    Florida Heat Pump
    Water Furnace


    Addison ~~~bottom of the barrel

    Just remember to have the system checked every year and might want to install bladder tank, as this helps on closed loop systems for water level rise/lower..
    "Everyday above ground, is a good day".
    "But everyday that you have made a difference in someones life, may insure you stay above ground a little longer".<aircooled>

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    NE PA
    Posts
    698
    Originally posted by tpa-fl
    Can anyone comment on the energy efficiency of these systems? I'm just curious, but with the heat capacity of water, I'd assume they're vastly more efficient than the typical air:air DX condensers.
    The efficiency of the heat pump is quite high, COP in the high 3's. Overall they tend to run about 2 times overall efficiency higher that an air-air unit. Add the ability to use a de-superheat heat exchanger on the compressor discharge to heat the domestic hot water, overall installation efficiency is quite good.

    The biggest negative is that the ground, while at a relatively constant temperature, is not the greatest heat transfer material (thermal resistance). This results in large suface area required for the ground pipe system. For a horizontal trench, for example, it is about 500 feet/ton. Vertical systems save area at the expense of installation cost (200-300 feet deep bore holes). Using well water or a pond is the system that can minimize ground space, but wells are expensive to install, and not everyone has a 1 acre+ pond on the property.

    One thing to remember is that modern air-air heat pumps can rival the ground source units for efficiency. The bane of the air-air is the capacity loss at low outside temperatures, resulting in callup of backup heat, and reduced overall efficiency of the system. Add the losses for backup heat when defrosting an air-air unit, and the overall efficiency drops again. In the ground source unit, since the water temp is usually in the low 40's at worst (or hi 70's for AC), the heat extraction/dissipation is high so the system operates at a much more optimal temperature that can be optimized. There is no defrost needed, and a properly sized GS system will rarely if ever require any backup heat.

    paul

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    1,634
    What about efficiency for cooling? Where I'm at, AC gets used 12 months out of the year.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    NE PA
    Posts
    698
    Originally posted by tpa-fl
    What about efficiency for cooling? Where I'm at, AC gets used 12 months out of the year.
    To be honest, I have not seen (or actually looked for) a ground source AC only unit. I suspect that the overall advantage is somewhat reduced with AC only as an operating mode. There must be some efficiency advantage with high ambient air temperatures, but that is most likely offset by the warm ground temperatures that exist in FL. Domestic HW is an efficiency benefit for sure.

    You would have to do some research to see what is available, and what the cost/payback ratio would be for your temperature zone. Here in the north, heating is the dominant cost factor.

    paul

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