Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    4
    Last November I bought a house that is heated with oil with baseboard throughout the house. Since that time, I've attempted to find a programmable thermostat that can keep my entire house warm. I purchased a raised ranch with cathedral ceilings and the bedrooms at the opposite end of the house. The thermostat in the house was the old style Honeywell with the mercury tube. It actually works pretty well; however, my wife and I wanted the convenience of a warm house in the morning.

    I've purchase two programmable thermostats, a mid priced Hoenywell from HD and a mid priced Hunters from Lowes. Each has had the same problem. They only allow half the house to warm up. The bedrooms have always been 2 degrees cooler than the larger part of the house (I suspect that it's due to the catherdral ceiings). Because of this, the thermostats shut off before the heat hits the bedrooms. Both thermostats indicated that they allow for one to two adjustments but they don't work. The old Honeywell is the only thing that keeps the house somewhat warm since it goes a degree or two above the setting.

    My heating company hasn't really helped and I don't believe it's the installation as I've installed at least 6 without a problem.

    I'm looking for any suggestions. I've seen some recommendations on the Vision Pro; however, I hate to install a new thermostat just to have the same problem. Is it truly adjustable? My dad says I should move the thermostat, which is in the middle of the house, closer to the bedrooms or even in one of the bedrooms. I'm not sure that this is worth the trouble. My current system is oil with baseboard throughout the house.

    Also, what opinion is there concerning ceiling fans in the bedrooms to draw the heat from the larger portion on the house.

    Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon
    Posts
    1,209
    It is a little difficult to give advice without more info. Even though your post is long you do not describe what the problem is. You say you want a thermostat to keep your house warm, if your home is not heating properly it may not be due to the t-stat. Give us a clue as to what the actual problem in heating is.
    Proud supporter of Springfield Millers and Oregon Ducks.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    4
    The problem is that with the prgrammable thermostats is that the house does not fully heat. It appears that the thermostats are so precise that when it reaches the set temp, let's say 68 degrees, it shuts off. This is great if your house is a ranch and the thermostat is in the middle of the house. My house has cathedral ceilings at one end and bedrooms at the other end. It seems as though the larger end warms up before the bedrooms. This cause the thermostat, which is in the middle of the house, to shut off before the water has fully circulated throughout the house. Consequently the bedrooms are cold. With the old Honeywell the thermostat doesn't shut off until the temp is a degree or two higher. I've tried to adjust the progammables but they don't work. The cycles are just too short.

    I hope that clarifies things a bit. If not, perhaps someone can suggest ways to keep the temperature uniform with cathedral ceilings. I was told ceiling fans in the bedroom could help by drawing the air down from the cathedral ceilings into the bedrooms. I appreciate any thoughts.




  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    697
    If your thermostat does not have an adjustable "heat anticipator," trade it in on one that does. Then set it so the heat runs longer before shutting off.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,736
    a good honeywell stat will have adjustment screws on back that need to be adjusted for hot water heat. stay away from hunter!!!!!!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Kingston Ontario Canada
    Posts
    1,210
    Originally posted by yacko456
    Last November I bought a house that is heated with oil with baseboard throughout the house. Since that time, I've attempted to find a programmable thermostat that can keep my entire house warm. I purchased a raised ranch with cathedral ceilings and the bedrooms at the opposite end of the house. The thermostat in the house was the old style Honeywell with the mercury tube. It actually works pretty well; however, my wife and I wanted the convenience of a warm house in the morning.

    I've purchase two programmable thermostats, a mid priced Hoenywell from HD and a mid priced Hunters from Lowes. Each has had the same problem. They only allow half the house to warm up. The bedrooms have always been 2 degrees cooler than the larger part of the house (I suspect that it's due to the catherdral ceiings). Because of this, the thermostats shut off before the heat hits the bedrooms. Both thermostats indicated that they allow for one to two adjustments but they don't work. The old Honeywell is the only thing that keeps the house somewhat warm since it goes a degree or two above the setting.

    My heating company hasn't really helped and I don't believe it's the installation as I've installed at least 6 without a problem.

    I'm looking for any suggestions. I've seen some recommendations on the Vision Pro; however, I hate to install a new thermostat just to have the same problem. Is it truly adjustable? My dad says I should move the thermostat, which is in the middle of the house, closer to the bedrooms or even in one of the bedrooms. I'm not sure that this is worth the trouble. My current system is oil with baseboard throughout the house.

    Also, what opinion is there concerning ceiling fans in the bedrooms to draw the heat from the larger portion on the house.

    Thanks for your help.

    The easiest way without any further ado, and if the thermistats don't have ajustable anticipators is to set your temps a bit higher and that will help keep the rooms that are cool, warmer.

    Thorton

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    you are lucky! =/- 3F is the normal variation to be expected from room to room just after blower shut down -- with whatever t-stat.

    [t-stats never heated/ cooled anything -- ]


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon
    Posts
    1,209
    The vision pro allows up to 12 cycles per hour although they recommend 3 cph for hot water systems. We use this stat alot and really like it. This may help your case.
    Thank you for clarifying your issues. Michael
    Proud supporter of Springfield Millers and Oregon Ducks.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Richmond
    Posts
    480
    Do you have Central Air Conditioning as well as the oil? If you do try running the fan on all the time. Hey it works in my Aunts house. If you have no A/C then try a Lux Thermostat. It lets you adjust for temperature differental. The cieling fan idea may work if you set them to push the warm air off the cieling.

    -York_Hvac

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,323
    The OP has a hydronic system, not forced air heat.

    To yacko, the VisionPro thermostat offers the option of a remote sensor. You could install one in the bedroom area. Only drawback, if I'm not mistaken, is a remote sensor disables the thermostat's on-board sensor, so you'd have to put in another one near the thermostat to get a sensor in that location. This might work to your advantage in that there might be a better location for the living area sensor than where the thermostat now is, but you wouldn't have to move the thermostat. It would require a little extra wiring, however.

    According to Honeywell, the VisionPro averages the temps between the sensors and acts accordingly. This might give you what you're looking for.

    One other thing to consider would be zoning your baseboards.
    • Electricity makes refrigeration happen.
    • Refrigeration makes the HVAC psychrometric process happen.
    • HVAC pyschrometrics is what makes indoor human comfort happen...IF the ducts AND the building envelope cooperate.


    A building is NOT beautiful unless it is also comfortable.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    1,634
    The real problem here isn't the thermostats -- it's that the heating system isn't balanced. The best thermostat in the world can't make a house heat evenly.

    1) Get rid of the crap consumer thermostats, especially the Hunter.

    2) Get the heating system balanced. Until you do that, one part of the house will always be too warm, another will always be too cool.

    3) Get a good thermostat (Honeywell VisionPro or White-Rodgers F95/F97 series) with remote sensors, which can get a better average temp reading of the structure. If possible, have the system zoned so you're heating the sections of the house that need it. If the bedrooms are cold, then only the bedrooms will be heated.

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