Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: propane furnace

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    new jersey
    Posts
    752
    im possibly doing a new house in pa in the fall.the homeowner is asking for price on 1 zone propane and 2 zone propane heating system.im assuming their is no natural gas in the area.oil/propane only.my question is is it ok for propane converted furnace in the attic area?and the other in the basement?maybe 1 zone oil located in the basement is the way.thanks for any thoughts on the subject.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Urbandale IA. USA
    Posts
    4,887
    I have seen too many LP 90+ furnaces that SOOT up when the gas company FORGOT to keep the tank full.
    I will NOT install an LP furnace with out a gas low preasure shutoff.

    my 2 cents.

    What about hot water heat?


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,666
    Originally posted by cehs
    I have seen too many LP 90+ furnaces that SOOT up when the gas company FORGOT to keep the tank full.
    I will NOT install an LP furnace with out a gas low preasure shutoff.

    my 2 cents.

    What about hot water heat?

    Thats bizarre. I've never heard of that one.
    Maybe they were using the old style single stage regulators at the tank.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,666
    Originally posted by coolmen
    im possibly doing a new house in pa in the fall.the homeowner is asking for price on 1 zone propane and 2 zone propane heating system.im assuming their is no natural gas in the area.oil/propane only.my question is is it ok for propane converted furnace in the attic area?and the other in the basement?maybe 1 zone oil located in the basement is the way.thanks for any thoughts on the subject.
    I don't see why not. But check local codes.
    It might get more attention(service) if the furnace is easily accessible or in a large second floor closet.
    But chances are the units will be oversized, unless the house is really big.
    You might consider zone dampers with one furnace in the basement.

    [Edited by oil lp man on 04-28-2005 at 01:47 PM]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,666
    Go with hot water heat. Unless you need central AC.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    NOT good!!!
    propane is heaver than air!
    so with any leak, propane may fill the living space = BOOM!

    better increase your insurance 400%

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    6,383
    Originally posted by cem-bsee
    NOT good!!!
    propane is heaver than air!
    so with any leak, propane may fill the living space = BOOM!

    better increase your insurance 400%
    On whose standards?

    LP equipment is no more of a danger than any other correctly installed and serviced equipment.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    2,868
    Originally posted by jultzya
    Originally posted by cem-bsee
    NOT good!!!
    propane is heaver than air!
    so with any leak, propane may fill the living space = BOOM!

    better increase your insurance 400%
    On whose standards?

    LP equipment is no more of a danger than any other correctly installed and serviced equipment.
    I agree, and there is nothing wrong using LP in any install that you would use natural gas. I have never seen or heard of a furnace sooting up because of the tank being out of gas and 50% of my installs are on LP. They have to be serviced just like any other furnace to prevent problems and my guess would be the sooting problem had nothing to do with running out of gas.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    6,383
    ICP has two LP conversion kits, one with and one without this pressure switch.

    I always install the PS kit. It's just good practice. What if one of the regulars freezes up (or malfunctions) a little and now the unit is operating at a lower gas pressure? It will soot, and that makes for one bad service call! (especially if 90+)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    657
    I have to agree with jultzya and trane. There is nothing wrong with propane furnaces even in the basement. Around here you have no choice outside the city limits. Electricity for heat is cost phrobitive around here. And for those who make comments about leaks in the basement filling up with propane and going boom. What about natural gas leaking and filling the upstairs and going boom? The only sooting problems I have seen is when the old ribbon burners start to flake and rust. I get called then because the furnace won't put out any heat.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    South/West of Quebec in the other part of Canada
    Posts
    2,331
    It is not a good idea to install anything hi efficiency in the attic. If a furnace problem goes unnoticed it could freeze the secondary heat exchanger. Think about a hi efficiency boiler and remote hydronic air handlers with glychol solution, you can use this system for domestic hot water aswell with an indirect hot water tank..

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    how about gas packs? that is what is used around this area -- whole unit sits OUTSIDE.


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event