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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    Woah, I didn't even look at the framing. It looks like someone actually cut the ends of everything square and installed them square.

    I don't think the, so called, "carpenters" down here even know what a square is.
    The $2,000,000 house we did the HVAC in recently looked like it had been framed by a high school construction education class. Fortunatly the PollySteel exterior walls should keep it from actually falling down in a stiff wind.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,292
    Back when I was about to frame my woodworking shop, I went and walked through some new houses going up nearby to get a bearing on things. Well, I learned more on how NOT to do things than anything! A neighbor of mine who at the time was a framer by trade came over to help me set the roof rafters after I had all the walls up. We first pulled a diagonal to see how square the entire structure was and found it a quarter inch off.

    Me, having not been exposed to the realities of blow and go tract house framing, fretted if a quarter inch off was bad.

    He looked at me, his eyes narrowing, and said, "Are you kidding? I've gone back on houses that were framed FIVE INCHES out of square!"

    I just stood there in disbelief, before that really cool feeling from hearing someone else confirm and praise your work set in.

    To the owner of this house: beauty is far more than skin deep. If your house has good bones, it will show ten times more in the finish. Straight, crisp walls and ceilings, cabinets that sit flush, door frames that aren't out of whack, etc. Looks like where you are there's still some guys that know true carpentry!

    • Electricity makes refrigeration happen.
    • Refrigeration makes the HVAC psychrometric process happen.
    • HVAC pyschrometrics is what makes indoor human comfort happen...IF the ducts AND the building envelope cooperate.


    A building is NOT beautiful unless it is also comfortable.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Very nice workmanship,hopefully the design work was to the same standard,if it is you'll have a great system.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    697
    Be sure to get the duct system leak tested with a Minneapolis Duct Blaster or by some other acceptable method.

    Are there returns, jumper ducts, or transfer grilles for each bedroom?

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold.calm
    Posts
    5,431
    So far so good. Someone is doing the right thing. If that unit is going to be used during construction have extra filters installed at returns and in the cabinet. Check these yourself. Have been on to many calls after job is compleated where coli is plugged with dust paper paint etc. Good luck with your new home.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Thibodaux, LA
    Posts
    1,170
    Looks good.

    Different than what we see and do here.

    I don't think they are finished but I would like to see the emergency drain trapped and filled with a nonevaporating fluid like mineral oil.

    From experience those prefabricatied P traps clog up frequently. I prefer to make my own or by a trap with a clean out on it.

    Must have been expensive with all that rectangle duct.
    "Football Season again finally"

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,597
    have the contractor install an E-Z trap. this has a removable float switch which will shut down the system in the event of a clog. they also have a clear trap and a brush so any debris that settles in the trap can be seen and removed.

    another safety device is a float switch for the emergency drain pan, wired in series with the e-z-trap.

    as for the trap in the emergency pan drain, i've never heard of that and am curious to see its purpose.

    good luck, looks good.

  8. #21
    good job ... we cant test it only see it ... one suggestion ... do not let duct touch each other or anything else ... will sweat

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    1,874
    A nice clean install sent to crap by flex duct.
    I guess it's easy to focus on a few good things when you short change the runs.

    Sorry it's a good looking job, I just hate flex.
    I'd run round pipe and sleeve insulate it.

    Have them put an emergancy float switch in the black drain pan.

    That could save a ceiling in a couple of yrs.
    If you try to fail, and succeed.
    Which have you done ?



  10. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Thibodaux, LA
    Posts
    1,170

    billva

    Originally posted by billva
    have the contractor install an E-Z trap. this has a removable float switch which will shut down the system in the event of a clog. they also have a clear trap and a brush so any debris that settles in the trap can be seen and removed.

    another safety device is a float switch for the emergency drain pan, wired in series with the e-z-trap.

    as for the trap in the emergency pan drain, i've never heard of that and am curious to see its purpose.

    good luck, looks good.
    The trap is not installed on the emergency pan. I'm sorry I did not make that statement clear.

    The trap would be installed on the secondary drain from the evaporator coil pan.

    The purpose is to prevent the unit from filling with water in the event of a primary drain clog. Priming the trap with a nonevaporating liquid keeps the air-handler from sucking hot humid air from the attic space. Also a trap should be used on the secondary also because both the primary and secondary drains are under negative pressure.

    Water alone in the trap will evaporate quickly. Anti-freeze, transmission fluid, or any light weight oil can be used to prime the secondary trap.
    "Football Season again finally"

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    6
    Thanks for all the opinions guys. I will stop by the jobsite today and see if is around.I asked him yesturday about the sizing and he went to his truck and pulled out some paper work with my Lot # on it. It doesn't mean much to me but he says it is sized according to the biggest load which is air conditioning.
    I also asked him about leak testing the system. He tells me that all the joints are sealed. If I want to leak test it I am more then welcome to pay for someone to come in and do it.
    Is it customary for the installing contractor to leak test his ducts on new construction?
    It seems some here think he did a good job and others don't.
    This can get very confusing.
    The general contractor and his subs do seem to have a good reputation around here.
    Thanks to all that have replied.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    If he sealed the ducts, do your self a favor at this point and dont mess with the leakage test. He hasnt skimped on anything yet so your well ahead.

  13. #26
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,414
    I agree, don't worry about the leak check. He's sealed the joints.. there might be a very small ammount of leakage but it's nothing to worry about.

    I've only seen a handfull of jobs leak checked, and they were high pressure commercial jobs and it was required by the engineer. God them tests suck lol

    About the quality of that job. There's always going to be room for improvement in any job. I'd say you definately have gotten a very good install though.

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