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  1. #1

    Make up air for woodstove

    I have a new house which I am going to install a free standing wood stove on the first floor. The house is in northern Michigan and is heated with radiant floor heat provided by a high efficency boiler provided with outside combustion air. The question I have is what is the best way to provide make up air for the wood stove per code. Currently I am thinking of installing a Condar ASV vent near the stove since I then can control the vent. Will this work or what are other ways of doing this.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    1,078
    What about the outside air kit sold to work with the stove?
    You could put an in-line damper in it to close it if needed, closest the end (outside) as possible.

  3. #3
    I do not have one that came with the stove. Also it is just a hose with a box that mounts to the stove and it will not look right in the great room.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Altmar, New York, United States
    Posts
    4,646
    it a code to do this? shy of just a vent through the wall i don't think any would look appealing. do you have a basement?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Smyrna, GA
    Posts
    6
    This Air Supply Ventilator is manually adjusted. Will you be opening when you start a fire then closing when fire and all embers are gone?

    When you say new home, I expect that it is brand new and built to comply with tightness codes. If so, how is your dryer supplied with air? Clothes dryers vent straight out too and need make up air.
    Last edited by Frontman; 11-18-2011 at 10:24 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,439
    Along the same lines, how do you provide fresh air ventilation for the home?
    Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    381
    HRV
    There is no bad beer, some just taste better than others.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,439
    Quote Originally Posted by rm-mi View Post
    I have a new house which I am going to install a free standing wood stove on the first floor. The house is in northern Michigan and is heated with radiant floor heat provided by a high efficency boiler provided with outside combustion air. The question I have is what is the best way to provide make up air for the wood stove per code. Currently I am thinking of installing a Condar ASV vent near the stove since I then can control the vent. Will this work or what are other ways of doing this.
    You need enough powered make-up air to avoid any negative pressure that is generated by the clothes drier/kitchen hood that could backdraft a smoldering wood fire when the clothes drier/hood and anyother exhaust device operates. Wind direction and velocity also get to be an issue.
    Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    33
    I definitely would use a sealed combustion system with direct vent (like your boiler likely has nowadays). when you don't do sealed combustion you will:

    -draw in cold air to make up combustion air; your oven room likely will be warm, but the rest of the house will get cold
    - assuming your house is tight, you may starve the stove or draw combustion products in your house; the stove gets too little air and combusts less completely (more CO, HC etc.)
    - if you use a manual damper or air supply ventilator to let air in I see the issue of a code violation since code likely requires a fail-safe automatic ventilation. At some point in time someone will forget to open or close that damper. Even if code is not an issue, it is not good.

    Most wood stoves are designed to have sealed combustion for that reason. You seem to have a boiler set up the same way. in principle the boiler is the same as a wood stove, except it uses different fuel. but combustion products and air supply issues are the very same. So treat them the same.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    vancouver island canada
    Posts
    8
    In a tight house wood stove can kill just like a gas appliance due to oxygen depletion or the production of CO under the wrong conditions. Feed the combustion air directly so the fire has no direct communication with the space it is heating. If this means an ugly pipe then so be it. The alternative is less pleasant (death)

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