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  1. #1

    Time for new furnace . Gas or electric?

    I have a house In Nebraska. House is about 2200 sq ft. House is built in 1975. My current system is original. I currently have a electric furnace with two electric strips (2 70 amp breakers). I will defiantly install a heat pump but cant seem to make up my mind on Gas or electric furnace for the emergency heat. also I cant seem to decide what SEER I should have installed?.

    Any input would be greatly appreciated
    Thanks
    Jake

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,330
    What is your gas rate, and what is your electric rate.
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    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Quad-Cities area (midwest).
    Posts
    2,739
    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky240 View Post
    I have a house In Nebraska. House is about 2200 sq ft. House is built in 1975. My current system is original. I currently have a electric furnace with two electric strips (2 70 amp breakers). I will defiantly install a heat pump but cant seem to make up my mind on Gas or electric furnace for the emergency heat. also I cant seem to decide what SEER I should have installed?.

    Any input would be greatly appreciated
    Thanks
    Jake
    With the 30% tax cedit on geothermal I would go with the straight geo or the split geo.

    In my area the utility co. pays more for the split system and it'll cost less to install.

    I cost more up front but pays big dividends.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Ward, Arkansas, United States
    Posts
    842
    Ideally you want to go with the highest SEER and HSPF you can afford, although I would keep in mind what you are really getting as it relates to ROI.

    IMO many traditional systems like air-source heat pumps/dual fuel have a clear line where it just gets too crazy to consider especially when there are other products such as Geo out on the market that offer better efficiency.

    So if your budget allows you might opt for GeoThermal especially taking into account possible tax credits if not local utility credits.

    http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/i...srp=1&state=NE
    You can go to that website and it will give you an idea of the incentives that may be in your area.

    My company does not offer GeoThermal systems of any kind so I can't really comment much further than that. It's just an end of the business we've never dipped into, even though there is a growing market for it here in Arkansas.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Round Rock
    Posts
    3,586
    Geo is out of most people's budget. It is typically 3-4 times as much as a conventional system unless you have some huge gov't subsidy to offset it. What you have to look at now is do you have gas available? Or are you going to have to pay to have that installed as well? If you're only choice is propane, stick with the electric heat strips as backup. If you have the choice of natural gas, then you might consider dual fuel.
    I like DIY'ers. They pay better to fix.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Jurupa Valley, CA
    Posts
    1,781
    I think in the end, the goal should be to never need the supplemental heater. If you can use the Heat Pump, it will almost always be the cheaper alternative. Therefore, if the emergency backup is never/rarely used, the efficiency of it really doesn't matter, so I'd go with the one that has the lower up front cost.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    nebraska
    Posts
    1,629
    Duel fuel if you have gas available. Electric resistance is the most expensive form of heat. We get cold enough a heat pump,even geothermal, can't keep up unless it's grossly oversized for cooling. With gas prices being cheap this year my economic balance point is set for 32 degrees even though the heat pump can heat the house down to 9 degrees.

  8. #8
    Geothermal is out of the question. I do not have gas at my house but the gas company will bring it in for free I just have to have heat and air company run it In my house. I was also told that tbe power company has speciak rate forcustomers with heat pumps.. I will call them tomorrow to see what they say and how would I quality... thanks
    Jake

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    southern california
    Posts
    535
    Gas is probably the way to go. The gas rate and electric rates are the key to your decision. Your budjet for replacement may not be set high enough. Remember heating systems are usually a 20 year investment. Do not go cheap in the beginning , consider the long term cost savings in energy.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Quad-Cities area (midwest).
    Posts
    2,739
    Quote Originally Posted by martyinlincoln View Post
    Duel fuel if you have gas available. Electric resistance is the most expensive form of heat. We get cold enough a heat pump,even geothermal, can't keep up unless it's grossly oversized for cooling. With gas prices being cheap this year my economic balance point is set for 32 degrees even though the heat pump can heat the house down to 9 degrees.
    Right. That's why a split-geo is nice. It doesn't need to be "grossly oversized" which can lead to ductwork issues, etc. and it's less money to install.

    It gets the 30 % tax credit plus all of the same utility rebates to bring the price in line with the "same old same old."

    You can get rid of the old condenser from the outside of the house if you wish (a little more money) or you can leave the new geo portion on outside (to save a little more).

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    1,070
    If you have gas to the house, I'd probably go with straight gas. Dual fuel systems are a lot more expensive that a heatpump with electric backup or a straight gas furnace. I've never lived in Nebraska but I know people who have - I'm told it's kinda like Siberia with cows!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    McCook NE
    Posts
    91
    I have a dual fuel and I'm pleased with it. I actually would have saved money to go all electric with electric hot water heater than to pay the customer fee for the 17-20 therms we use for our tankless water heater. NPPD also gives a lower rate to houses that are all electric. But even without that the rates drop to 4.5 cents a KWh after 750 KWh. We enjoy pretty inexpensive electric rates out here in Siberian cattle country.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    va
    Posts
    800
    I would go with a standard 13 or 14 seer heatpump system and call it a day. Compared to the strait electric furnace you have, you will see night and day savings with it. You will be happy!

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