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  1. #92
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    1,560

    A pound is not a pound indeed............

    Dear Poodle Head Mikey,

    The wizard title was from the biography of your own profile section that you yourself wrote, so if you’re not comfortable with the title, I might consider removing it from my bio, if I were you.

    I too had a “Perley Barker” as a mentor, his name was Rufus Henessey, and what he didn’t know about large ammonia refrigeration systems, wasn’t worth knowing. He lived into his late eighties, but has since gone to be with the Lord’s HVAC service crew. Learned a lot about refrigeration from that man, also learned a lot about people as well.

    Well, back to the present time. Good news my friend, your about to learn something new on this thread, contrary to your last post about learning nothing new.

    A pound, in fact, is NOT a pound indeed. You see, a pound of feathers weights approximately 33% more than a mere pound of gold, and that is a solid fact my friend!

    You see, all precious gems and metals, including gold, is weighted in the “troy system” of weights, this system has twelve (12) ounces in its pound. Feathers on the other hand, like all other common items, are weighted in the “avoirdupois system” of weights; this system of course has sixteen (16) ounces in its pound. Therefore the 16 ounces of feathers weight approximately 33% more than the 12 ounces of gold. I told you this was not as simple as it first looks. And there you have it…..you can now say you learned something on this thread.

    Respectfully Submitted,
    John J. Dalton



  2. #93
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
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    1,560
    Dear Poodle Head Mikey,

    Regarding your previous post:

    “I sometimes wonder if it isn't the ultimate horror of the truely competent when they are dying - so much work, so much accumulated knowing; no matter how self-satisfying, still; gone for nothing in the end.”

    I couldn’t agree with you more my friend. So many truly gifted and experienced service technicians go to their grave without mentoring a single individual in their life time, what a waste, what a crime.

    That’s why I believe in a complete and comprehensive study program with all of our junior and senior service technicians. A forum, be it online, in person, or across the phone, it a great way to exchange ideas, knowledge, experience, and personal preferences within the company I work for, let alone, everyone else out in the HVAC/R field. Great service technicians have a solemn obligation to share their years of accumulated hands on experience with anyone that asks for it within a given forum or decor.

    Just my own option mind you…………………..

    Respectfully Submitted,
    John J. Dalton



  3. #94
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    1,560
    Dear Chill factor,

    Regarding your previous post:

    “I'll answer it! A pound is a pound. Its volume is different for the both objects.”

    Although you’re right that the densities of these two items are different, the feathers, I’m afraid, still do weight approximately 33% more than the gold does.

    Remember, things aren’t always as they may first appear………….

    Respectfully Submitted,
    John J. Dalton



  4. #95
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    1,560

    Dare I ask?

    Dear Poodle Head Mikey,

    Friend, I only asked you how long you’ve been in this industry. A simple 20, 25, 30 years would have sufficed. Too long, or not long enough, are all relative terms and quantify nothing. But thank you for your monolog. Still don’t have the answer. I’m a little concerned, but I’ll dare to ask my next question since I know from your bio that you went to HVAC School in the 1970s, making your time in the industry somewhere between 25 and 35 years. Is your experience in the residential, light commercial, industrial, institutional, or specialty fields?

    Respectfully Submitted,
    John J. Dalton


  5. #96
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Posts
    2,985
    The earliest English weight system was based on the 12-ounce troy pound, which provided the basis on which coins were minted and gold and silver weighed. This troy system modeled the Roman system as their coins were in circulation during this time of the Saxon kings. The troy pound weighs 5760 grains.

    The avoirdupois pound was a 16-ounce pound that came about around the year 1300. "Avoir du pois" is a French term meaning "goods of weight". This pound weighs 7000 grains. Merchants preferred a pound that could be easily divided into 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16. The avoirdupois ounce was further divided into 16 drams.

    Unfortunately, the two English ounce units don't agree: the avoirdupois ounce is 7000/16 = 437.5 grains while the troy ounce is 5760/12 = 480 grains. Conversion between troy and avoirdupois units is awkward; and no one wanted to bother with it. The troy system quickly became highly specialized, used only for precious metals and for pharmaceuticals, while the avoirdupois pound was used for everything else.

    Now you know the rest of the story.

  6. #97
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
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    Dear Shophound,

    Nice to see you here at this thread, I know our paths have crossed on other threads. Just checked out your website, nice pictures, and nice life it would appear. I’m guessing from the limited information I saw that you either work for a hospital, or health care facility in Texas. Twelve and all ready interested in the HVAC/R field, that’s a great story friend.

    Respectfully Submitted,
    John J. Dalton

  7. #98
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    Is Paul Harvey still alive?
    The way we build has a greater impact on our comfort, energy consumption and IAQ than any HVAC system we install.

    http://www.ductstrap.com/

  8. #99
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    1,560
    Dear Andy Schoen,

    I see we shop for information from the same website my friend. Always a pleasure seeing the post of a gifted and knowledgeable person such as yourself. No flattery intended, I’ve read your other posts on this, and other threads and consider your point of views accurate. Good evening.

    Respectfully Submitted,
    John J. Dalton

  9. #100
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Posts
    2,985
    Then you may be aware that I've spent a fair amount of time developing a unit converstion program of perhaps some interest: http://www.sporlan.com/unitconverter.htm

    The graphic was a creation of my talented advertising dept.

  10. #101
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Posts
    2,985
    Mmmm... I see where we have a cgi problem on our site. A direct link to the file: http://www.sporlan.com/UnitConv14.zip

  11. #102
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    3,400
    Originally posted by Carnak
    Is Paul Harvey still alive?
    Now THAT's a good question. LOL

  12. #103
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,289
    Originally posted by john dalton
    Dear Shophound,

    Nice to see you here at this thread, I know our paths have crossed on other threads. Just checked out your website, nice pictures, and nice life it would appear. I’m guessing from the limited information I saw that you either work for a hospital, or health care facility in Texas. Twelve and all ready interested in the HVAC/R field, that’s a great story friend.

    Respectfully Submitted,
    John J. Dalton
    John,

    Thanks for the kind words, I'm glad you enjoyed my site.

    The man who mentored me in those early days and into my teens was named WW Pardue. He was a member of RSES and encouraged me to join once I entered the trade. He was in his 70's when I first met him and kept at it until his early nineties when his health wouldn't let him go any further. He worked out of an old station wagon. Looking back on his work now, he seemed more cut out for market work than residential a/c as he was a controls nut, installing stuff on our system that most residential units at the time never had.
    He loved NASA and the Apollo program and seldom missed a launch. He would sometimes drop by our house even when our a/c didn't need any attention just so he could talk and leave me some Apollo souvenirs, which I wish I still had. He also loved to talk politics with my dad, since dad was a political cartoonist.

    Later, when I did get employment in the trade, I once mentioned Pardue's name while in a supply house. Laughter and scorn followed...I guess the feeling was the old guy was a bit off his rocker and should retire. Perhaps because he worked out of a station wagon, it sent up the "hack" flag. And that he was never satisfied with the status quo way of doing things so common in the trade. He probably drew similar glances as perhaps airman1 might when he walks into a supply house and asks for a balanced port expansion valve to put on a residential system.

    But I'll never forget the time Pardue took to mentor me, and it's a favor I wish to return on someone entering the trade and needs some decent guidance.
    My coworkers at the time of the Pardue bashing also scoffed the worth of RSES. Only later did I come around to understand how wrong they were. Mark Beiser, a member on this board, got a knowing chuckle out of me the other day when I first read his new sig line, "Join RSES or die!"

    Sorry, folks, if this was a bit off-topic. To make it more on topic I suppose I could close by saying that Pardue really understood refrigeration theory and application. If we had more techs like him out in the field mentoring, perhaps a discussion of whether an overcharge of refrigerant in and of itself in an air conditioning system with all other parameters normal would cause an evap coil to freeze up would be considerably shorter.

    That, and "Join RSES or die!"
    • Electricity makes refrigeration happen.
    • Refrigeration makes the HVAC psychrometric process happen.
    • HVAC pyschrometrics is what makes indoor human comfort happen...IF the ducts AND the building envelope cooperate.


    A building is NOT beautiful unless it is also comfortable.

  13. #104
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    1,560
    Dear Shop hound,

    Regarding your previous post:

    “My coworkers at the time of the Pardue bashing also scoffed the worth of RSES. Only later did I come around to understand how wrong they were. Mark Beiser, a member on this board, got a knowing chuckle out of me the other day when I first read his new sig line, "Join RSES or die…”

    I’ve been a member of RSES for the last 15 years, earned a CM, am studying for my CMS in heat pumps, and my only regret is not joining much earlier. Service technicians that laugh at RSES members are either “some” union people, and other service technicians that have either arrived at their total knowledge point and are perfect in their execution of their craft, or people that simply don’t know any better, a sad lot just the same.


    ”Sorry, folks, if this was a bit off-topic. To make it more on topic I suppose I could close by saying that Pardue really understood refrigeration theory and application. If we had more techs like him out in the field mentoring, perhaps a discussion of whether an overcharge of refrigerant in and of itself in an air conditioning system with all other parameters normal would cause an evap coil to freeze up would be considerably shorter.

    Sorry, I got a bit confused with your words you are saying, I hope that you are saying that you CAN NOT ice a system up with a simple overcharge of an air conditioning system. Right?

    In closing, off topic or not, our former mentors should be inspiration for our wanting, and needing to spread our HVAC knowledge to new service technicians at this forum and beyond.

    Respectfully Submitted,
    John J. Dalton



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