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  1. #1
    I will be installing a radiant system in a new construction having a 1400 Sq ft floor area with a cathedral ceiling covering 21,000 cu ft of volume above the floor. I am considering Warmboard vis a vie staple up and would appreciate any recommendations.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Serving Northern Va and surounding area
    Posts
    38
    Maybe you should call Bob Villa

    Have you recived any bids yet ? call your local reptucal company and sales person should show and explain all your questions

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Northeastern Illinois
    Posts
    611
    Warm board is quite expensive and is usually for additions and remodeling. I would recommend 1/2"Wirsbo with a gypcrete overpour. You get better thermal mass and you can put the tubing closer together if need be. Have a heat load done on your house before you start it. It can really save some money.LOL
    If it ain't broke don't fix it!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    PA/DE area
    Posts
    1,535
    I agree on the gyptcrete also
    It's NOT the BRAND,it's the company that installs it!!!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    1,196
    I would first see what the floor BTU load is to see if "staple up" is viable. BTW I would never do straight staple up-emission plates/tube are the only way to fly IMO.

    Warmboard is meant to be the actual subfloor, as you probaly know, so make sure framing is up to par. I have found WB to be kind of regional in availibility. Here in CT, it is never seen, seems more prominent out west.

    It's all in the radiant design to see how much cushion you would have using any under floor application. Wirsbo's Quiktrac is an exellent product for above floor installation, and it is turnkey for hardwood floor, you would want 1/4" Durock over it for tile. Gyp pours are kind of a PIA since you need to schedule and have 3 or more trades in for the job..to lay tube, to lay sleepers if hardwood is used, to pour. Don't forget that in between the sleepers, you may not have positive contact with the finish floor if the gyp isn't right even with the sleepers (surface variations, etc.)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    manitowoc wisconsin
    Posts
    4,943
    check into rehau pex.The raupanel is an alternative to a gyp pour but it is expensive & used mainly in old construction that does not have the structural support needed for a gypcrete pour.I would use nothing less than rehau or wirsbro for your choice of piping.
    Take your time & do it right!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Northeastern Illinois
    Posts
    611
    hydronicsman,I agree with you on the al plates but, if you are using hardwood or tile you cannot use plates. Why would you have to use 3 trades for gypcrete. We do all of it so I know it is done the way I want it. When we do concrete slabs we also install the insulation,mesh and the tubing. It takes alot more to heat up through 3/4" plywood than it does to heat gypcrete. You also get the benefit of fire proofing and sound proofing with the overpour.
    If it ain't broke don't fix it!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    3,708
    I dont think hydro was saying rather a dry system was better then a wet system,I believe what he was saying is weigh all your option.

    Also I believe with any job budget restraint seem to dictate
    the appoach as well as the design of the building envelope
    and people.

    In my area you can not sell above wetfloor install,they will
    back out every time when they weight the cost of gypcrete
    system.Warmboard not happening either.

    All our system or under the plates system..every now and
    again we may do a 4''slab,and personally trying to control
    that slab in not something I look forward too.

    Dry system is the way of life for me,and all is well.












  9. #9

    I appreciate the valuable comments

    I should mention, this will be new timber frame/SIP structure located in Wyoming at 6,500 elevation and 50 miles to the nearest nail; I will be using wood as a floor finish; and I will be my own general contractor by default as no one nearby has more experience with the type of construction.

    I am trying to keep the installation as simple as possible and keeping the number of different trades to a minimum. I recognize the expense of Warmboard, the framing should not be a significant issue as one mentioned, but I wonder whether the added expense is worth it, I am hesitant to go to a wet system, and although I recognize that wood is not a good conductor, I wonder why I cannot just lay more piping under the floor with suitable reflection and insulation to achieve the same result at a lesser cost.

    I am also assuming that because the SIP panels offer a well-insulated tight envelope and the floor area is not exceptionally large, a "staple up" system should be possible even though I will get heat loss through extensive windowing.

    But, I recognize a heat load calculation should be done. But where do I get the info as to how? I have general engineering knowledge but no experience in this area. Is there any place on the web that offers software or a manner of doing this?

    Again, I appreciate your taking the time to comment.


  10. #10

    Please See New Thread

    I thought it would be best to continue this topic under a new thread, see Warmboard Continued.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    1,196
    why can't you use plates w/ tile or HWD Dof?

    The gyp guy around here is an independent contractor-another guy to schedule and supervise.

    Sleeper installation is left to the GC, another guy to schedule and supervise.

    Slab jobs are much easier to control

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Northeastern Illinois
    Posts
    611
    Where are they going to put the nails for the underlayment or do your guys just glue it down. I have yet to see a flooring guy give a sh.. about the heating system. You should use clips that hold the tubing down from the floor to avoid getting nailed. We put in our own sleepers and let the gypcrete guy do his thing. It only takes a phone call and a little organization to get a good job. The staple up is a lot more time consuming than any overpour I have ever done and it works alot better with cooler water temps. Cooler water temps means that condensing boiler can do what it is supposed to do.
    If it ain't broke don't fix it!!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    1,196
    We have the floor guys nail on joists, or do it after. Clipped/grinded a nail or two in my day!

    I've done suspended tube before, but prefer not to due to the higher water temps needed, and the hassle of getting the insulators to maintain the air gap..

    Floor heights are always an issue, so most of my non-slab jobs are either plates or Quiktrac. Love the overpours too with the pex rails-they go fast. My area has extremely high construction costs, so we don't see much gyp at all..

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