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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,025

    Using non-factory motors

    On the stores are work on we have two types of Blodgett Ovens, some gas some electric.

    Ctb1 (electric) and the gas I dont know a model number for. Ill carry one motor and blower wheel for either, for the gas its 110v and elec its 208v, the specs are the same between both motors (rpm, hp) only difference is shaft dia. and rotation.

    I was talking with my boss man wondering why not just carry one motor thats multivoltage, and reversiable rotation with the smaller of the two shaft sizes and just use a bushing to adapt the shaft size.

    whats your thoughts on using a non oem motor

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lake Worth, FL
    Posts
    111
    Those OEM motors are designed to handle the heat from the oven. All it will take is you trying one generic motor that fails prematurely and then you'll realized you can't do that in all situations.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    104
    Quote Originally Posted by pairman View Post
    Those OEM motors are designed to handle the heat from the oven. All it will take is you trying one generic motor that fails prematurely and then you'll realized you can't do that in all situations.
    Agreed
    Mark

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Russellville, Alabama
    Posts
    26
    I don't work on ovens, but have the following information if it would be of some help to you.

    Electric motors come in a variety of ratings. There's industrial, commercial, severe, washdown, and inverter duty. As long as the frame, hp, voltage, rpm's, and rotation are the same, i'll use a non-OEM motor in a heartbeat. However, if you feel your application requires something special, i'd take one of the burned out motors to a reputable motor winding shop and ask them if there was anything special about it. They can tell you - as they would know better than anyone. Just my 2 cents

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Red Deer, Alberta
    Posts
    653
    Quote Originally Posted by Auburn Tigers View Post
    I don't work on ovens, but have the following information if it would be of some help to you.

    Electric motors come in a variety of ratings. There's industrial, commercial, severe, washdown, and inverter duty. As long as the frame, hp, voltage, rpm's, and rotation are the same, i'll use a non-OEM motor in a heartbeat. However, if you feel your application requires something special, i'd take one of the burned out motors to a reputable motor winding shop and ask them if there was anything special about it. They can tell you - as they would know better than anyone. Just my 2 cents
    I'd have to agree with you, OEM usually/generally means that you are paying more for a generic (GE manufactured or something like it) but has the OEM name on it...

    My 2 cents also...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lake Worth, FL
    Posts
    111
    Don't forget hi temp bearings

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    109
    I've had good luck with taking the old motor to the motor shop in town and having it re-done. I saved the customer hundreds on the cost of that Hobart motor for his potato peeler
    If your not part of the solution, You must be part of the problem

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