Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 14
  1. #1

    Fresh outta tech school..

    My name is Mike, I graduated tech school last month. I finished school top of the class and perfect attendence. I am epa universal certified as well. Im one of those guys that tends to "lose it if i dont use it". So I'll be creeping around on here trying to keep the knowledge fresh in my head until I can find a damn job. If yall have any links that you would recommend I study I be greatly appreciated. Especially anything involving wiring and electrical circuits.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    In a boiler room
    Posts
    7,068
    Hi and welcome!!!

    This site is a great resource.

    Once you have 15 posts you can apply for pro membership where you will learn a lot more!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Andover Kansas
    Posts
    2,115
    Welcome Mike,

    Congrats on finishing school and with the grade you did. I think you will find this site to be a wonderful place of knowledge and experience and like Chuck said, the pro forums are where you can really learn.

    Take care and see ya around,
    .


    The statement below is my signature and just my overall feeling towards our industry and does not necessarily pertain to you nor this thread.


    There really isn't a legitimate excuse for not doing the job correctly!

  4. #4
    thanks guys I look forward to learning alot more here

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    New jersey
    Posts
    33
    I been hanging around this forum for a little bit. Don't have pro membership yet but will tryvto work on it. I'll be graduating tech school in a few months and so far been doingvreslly well. Do also would like to find out about jobs and what the jobs outlook is.

  6. #6
    keep it up eye. its a lot to learn.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Scranton, PA
    Posts
    32
    Thats the way it seems at hvac schools alot of heat pumps,refrigeration, and A/C but very little heat (no steam at all) and very little electricity. Why is that?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Russellville, Alabama
    Posts
    26

    school

    I'd like to add that my son is currently enrolled in school for hvac (19 yrs. old), and I hope he finishes with a degree in it. It would be great if he'd know something when he graduated, too. I can only hope that he and the instructors are really applying themselves...

    Rheem29, i'd like to add that most HVAC instructors aren't qualified to teach about steam boilers, because really having an excellent understanding about them is entirely different trade in itself. I view electrical the same way.
    Last edited by Auburn Tigers; 01-17-2011 at 05:18 PM. Reason: wanted to keep from posting back to back

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Auburn Tigers View Post
    I'd like to add that my son is currently enrolled in school for hvac (19 yrs. old), and I hope he finishes with a degree in it. It would be great if he'd know something when he graduated, too. I can only hope that he and the instructors are really applying themselves...

    Rheem29, i'd like to add that most HVAC instructors aren't qualified to teach about steam boilers, because really having an excellent understanding about them is entirely different trade in itself. I view electrical the same way.
    I agree tiger, we didnt learn about steam boilers at all. They taught us how to wire up systems but by repitition not by teaching us the real science of electricity and how it works.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Russellville, Alabama
    Posts
    26

    boilers, electrical

    Mike,

    When I went to trade school (which was a long time ago), neither were taught very much either. However, being in an industrial maintenance environment for the last 24 years has thankfully allowed me to learn about both - in detail. I tell ya, there's no way they could jam all that info in a 2 year course - maybe 5 years would be possible, though.
    We have what I would consider to be high pressure boilers (rated at 200 psi, operated at 170), and that's a little more than the average HVAC person is comfortable with.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    86
    Quote Originally Posted by Rheem29 View Post
    Thats the way it seems at hvac schools alot of heat pumps,refrigeration, and A/C but very little heat (no steam at all) and very little electricity. Why is that?
    Ugh. I had lots & lots of electricity theory, was sick of calculating ohms/volts/amps over & over. Did a lot of diagrams & actual wiring up, too. I guess it depends on the school, and how long (and how much) they get you for.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    19
    Wish I went to school for hvac instead of electrical engineering. Pretty much had to learn everything while in the field by watching others and trial and error.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Puzzler View Post
    Ugh. I had lots & lots of electricity theory, was sick of calculating ohms/volts/amps over & over. Did a lot of diagrams & actual wiring up, too. I guess it depends on the school, and how long (and how much) they get you for.

    7 months and 21k

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event