Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 14 to 23 of 23
  1. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Seattle Area
    Posts
    96
    I believe that 90% of the work in a new system can be preformed by a DIY'er, under the guidance of an HVAC contractor. UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF AN HVAC CONTRACTOR. I have done several of these jobs, love em. I engineer and advise the DIY'er, he gets a good system and I make as much as installing my-self, PRICELESS!

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    St Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    3,468
    I think it would be nice on here if when a homeowner asks something you don't want to answer, don't. But don't get all over them about reading the rules, leave that to the moderators to decide if they want to stop the thread. Our industry has enough bad press with the bad apples we have working in it, we don't want homeowners leaving here with a bad impression of us. - Bald Loonies reply from above.

    I think so too. Just read the thread from the homeowner trying to diagnose his Lennox board fault. Merely wanted to know about the 120v and 24v side. Now, had he posted with a Ms name, 20 posters would have given elaborate details and information. Most would have ended up recommending getting a service call. This homeowner even quoted the rules and he was right. But, he went away empty handed. How will he feel towards the industry as a whole?

    Maybe, since this site has evolved so much, it is time to have a DIYer category where those in the field who want to be helpful can.

    I can purchase a DVD that explains how to fix almost anything or the Dummies guide to whatever. Does this put a mass of professionals out of work?

    Better to lead a future customer along than to beat him mercilessly with your keyboard.




    [Edited by MikeJ on 03-14-2005 at 06:30 AM]

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    1,383
    Personally, I'm glad to take the time to try to help DIYers on these boards. I try to draw the line at encouraging people to do things that might get them in trouble.

    I try to be helpful to people who call me on my business phone line, but also am concerned that people will make errors that will cause property damage or injury and get me sued. So I limit the advice I will give.

    Also, I commonly find taking phone calls to be a pain, which may limit the advice I give. Also, I don't like giving advice to people who argue with me or don't want to hear what they are told.

    I was asked to inspect the new furnace installation done by an acquaintance who is an auto mechanic. He did pretty well, but the DIY aspect was apparent in some of the decisions made. For example, he had the shutoff valves to the gas range behind the wall in the furnace compartment, and behind the furnace as well where it was almost inaccessable. He had the furnace shutoff valve a ways back where it was possible to get at but difficult, and a long flex connector to get from the shutoff valve into the furnace compartment to the furnace gas valve.

    Also, I would have made the return ductwork large, just eyeballing it. And the sheet metal for the return air would come off vertically when there was inadequate clearance for the flex duct he wanted to use to make a 90 degree turn. I suggested he buy a new sheet metal fitting such that the takeoff would come from the side, rather than from on top. That would avoid the 90 degree turn.


    So--- there were problems he wasn't especially good at recognizing. Of course, that's why he asked me to come over and look over the installation. But I looked for significant problems, not relatively minor ones.

    In short, his installation wont be as good as that done by a pro (at least a pro worthy of the name), but it will be safe and do the job OK..



    Seattle Pioneer

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    20,677
    Maybe DIYer questions could be limited to those with "yes" or "no" answers. That way, if there is a question that cannot be answered Y or N, they would have to have a pro look at it, bid the job, do the work with appropriate compensation. If the question can be answered Y or N, then the DIYer is most likely able to do it himself.

    I could be wrong. I was wrong once before...I thought I had made a mistake but I had not.
    No reserve. No retreat. No regrets.

    For those who have fought for it, freedom has a sweetness the protected will never know.

    http://www.airwarvietnam.com/16thSOSGunners2.jpg

    Proud member of KA Club

  5. #18
    I love to the help the poor slobs as well.
    I would be up for a true-false help area, if that works out we could upgrade to mulitple choice someday.
    Hey cockroach, don't bug me!

    www.AskTheDiceman.com

    www.TheColdConspiracy.com

    www.Pennwood-HVAC.Com

    Bring Em Home....

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    St Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    3,468
    Need help troubleshooting gas furnace - 16 replies

    This recent one is a good example of the problem with helping a DIY'er.

    Dice: Do you thinks a Y/N'er approach would work here?
    This guy is over his head and should not be walked thru a repair. 1. Furnace has been neglected for at least 3 yrs
    2. "I changed out the t'stat and that didn't help.

    Then after a few of his posts....general replys follow: check filter, sensor,, and other guesses.

    And then the poster disappears and the posts continue.

    I see it both ways. Yes help them, no don't help them.


  7. #20
    Originally posted by MikeJ

    Dice: Do you thinks a Y/N'er approach would work here?


    And then the poster disappears and the posts continue.



    Not really.
    He blew himself up, too bad.
    Hey cockroach, don't bug me!

    www.AskTheDiceman.com

    www.TheColdConspiracy.com

    www.Pennwood-HVAC.Com

    Bring Em Home....

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    8
    I like that if members don't want to answer they don't have to. It may be that by replying they would open a can of worms and have to explain every concept of HVAC by the end. but some response would be helpful. the response may be "messing with that part of the system is not something a HO should do, give a local hvac company a call". I use other forums that range from excel help, truck entheusiests, home theater PC's, and on occasion I have come here to the HVAC site.

    In the excel page the format is different. the site is for training, and if you are wrong the worst that can happen is your file wont work right. could be a problem if the file is for work and the info is needed. but nobodies life is on the line

    In the truck page, vehicles are more common knowlege than hvac, you can hurt yourself, but in all most people don't try to do more than they can handle. Newbies start with drop in upgrades, as they learn more they try more. most know their limits and don't intend to try porting heads in their garage or oversizing cylinders with a craftsman drill and a hone. I added a posi to my truck and had no intention of installing it myself. definately over my head. not to mention I don't have the speciality tools to get it right. I found that out by the responses of the people in that forum. and the response I got was a rough explanation of the process and why they would't recomend it to be a diy project.

    The idea that diy questions be answered in a yes or no format would be rather useless to me. that would mean I already know the answer and just want a rubber stamp. Multiple choice may be more reasonable.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,317
    As within our own trade, there's a wide range of competency among DIY work. My own house is an example of me, a DIY'er, cleaning up the messes of the previous owner, also a DIY'er. And, to be honest, I'm also going behind and cleaning up some of my own messes that were made when I had less experience and knowledge. None of those messes, however, were life threatening.

    The previous owner decided to take in the garage and either himself thought or hired a contractor who thought a 1,200 sq. ft. house needed to go from two tons of air conditioning to 3 1/2 to cool an additional 300 square feet of living space. Result? Unit is oversized and does not dehumidify house as well as it should.

    Ever since I took on the task of literally building my own workshop, I have undertaken the necessity of thoroughly investigating what I need to know to complete a project before starting it. As a result, the job goes much less painfully and the end result is much more satisfying for all concerned. If that's the approach a DIY'er takes with all his endeavors, then I say more power to him. Otherwise he should defer to a pro when he's out of his element and can't bridge the gap.
    • Electricity makes refrigeration happen.
    • Refrigeration makes the HVAC psychrometric process happen.
    • HVAC pyschrometrics is what makes indoor human comfort happen...IF the ducts AND the building envelope cooperate.


    A building is NOT beautiful unless it is also comfortable.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,458
    In my case as a utility serviceman who only diagnois problems and make "screwdriver adjustments",clean pilots ,burners,flame rods,adj heat anticipators,you get the picture no parts replacement, I would routinely be asked "can my husband fix it" and my reply would be there is the bad part if he can figure how to replace without step by step or call a dealer, which most did. Normally if h.o did his own repair we would get a followup call to leak check no matter what they replaced.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event