Which one: Projection or Plasma
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  1. #1
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    Looking to upgrade the main television from a 36" to a Plasma or Projection. Any ideas??

  2. #2
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    Originally posted by rob10
    Looking to upgrade the main television from a 36" to a Plasma or Projection. Any ideas??

    Projection is the best for movies & video games.If you buy a Plasma don't let anyone play games on it or pulse a movie for very long,it will burn it on the screen.

  3. #3
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    So, how do you prevent burn-in on your brand-new plasma television screen?

    (1) Some obvious advice: Do not leave static images on your plasma TV screen. Turn off your unit when you are not watching it. Do not pause DVDs for more than a few minutes at a time.

    (2) Know that plasma screens are more prone to burn-in during their first 200 hours of use. When phosphors are fresh, they burn more intensely as they are ignited. This means that relatively new plasma display panels are prone to ghosting, which occurs when on-screen images appear to stay on the screen belatedly. This is probably just a function of the high intensity with which new phosphors "pop," and this phenomenon usually "washes out" on its own, as the screen displays subsequent images. When static images are left on new plasma screens too long (more than a few minutes at a time), though, ghosting quickly develops into something more permanent -- burn-in.

    Self-Defense: Break your new plasma monitor in slowly. Keep the CONTRAST set at or below 50% -- any higher only causes phosphors to glow more intensely, which decreases the length of time necessary for burn-in to occur. And, be sure to avail yourself of your plasma's anti-burn-in features. These are monotone gray or snow screen settings that "wash" your plasma screen by recalibrating pixel intensity levels uniformly. This reduces the visual effects of ghosting. It's probably a good idea to run one of these screen "wash" cycles after about 100 viewing hours or so. (Note: These processes will impact the lifespan of the phosphors in your unit, so you should run them selectively and on an as-needed basis.)

    (3) Know, too, that some plasma display panels burn-in more easily than others. In my experience, AliS type panels -- the ones utilized by Hitachi and Fujistu -- seem more readily given over to problems with burn-in.

    (4) Utilize burn-in protection like power management settings, full-time picture shift (both vertical and horizontal), and automatic screen-saver functions. Check your Owner's Manual for further information.

    (5) Realize that quality matters with burn-in as with everything else. You definitely want to purchase a plasma monitor that has really good scaling, so that you can watch 4:3 TV programs in widescreen comfortably. It is just not a good idea to leave black bars on your TV screen for prolonged periods of time, so you are probably better off watching most everything in "full screen" mode. This should not really bother you, if your TV exhibits good full-screen scaling.

    Also, higher quality TVs tend to be more resistant to burn-in -- though not entirely immune to it, of course. Of the plasma displays I've owned and/or tested extensively, NEC, Sony, Pioneer, and Panasonic seemed least prone to burn-in once their pictures were properly broken in. Even so, I would NEVER leave a static image on any plasma TV screen, regardless of quality, for more than hour.

  4. #4
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    Thanks Frame

    That's a lot of info!!

  5. #5
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    Is the lifespan of a plasma around 10 years? Fact or Myth?

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by bb
    Is the lifespan of a plasma around 10 years? Fact or Myth?
    I think that I read that somewhere.

  7. #7
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    Assuming the average American household watches 4 to 6 hours of television per day, a plasma display will last between 13 and 20 years. If you think about it, that's quite a bit of bang for your buck.


    Bang for the buck,no I don't think so what a domb@ss statement.

  8. #8
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    So my new black and white 25" console is out of style all ready?

  9. #9
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    Originally posted by mattm
    So my new black and white 25" console is out of style all ready?

    Just give it time mattm everything comes back in style.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    8
    Between projection and plasma.
    there are benifits to both.

    I would lean towards DLP projection

    Plasma is made up of many tiny florescent bulbs. when some goes bad the whole tv is shot. though during its life the picture is arguably the best available.
    Projection has several different types available. there is the old sytle which is like a normal crt tv image projected on a screen. the bad is that it is dim and the viewing angles were narrow, from the sides it looks near black. not recomemded.
    there are LCD projection. these use an light shining through a lcd screen and the image is what is not blocked by the lcd. up close these can leave a sort of grid appearance, the newer ones are better than the older ones but it is still there.
    DLP uses reflection across micro mirrors. so unlike lcd being filtered and losing light transmission DLP will reflect nearly all the light. there is no grid effect. and no burn in problems. bulbs are relatively inexpensive, a couple hundered dollars. and when replaced the image is as good as the day the unit was purchased. the only concern I have heard of for DLP is something called rainbow effect. the image goes though a color wheel and on the older generations the syncing may have been off and a few people could see unwanted colors in the areas surrounding contrasting colors. supposedly this has been improved in the current generations. I have read that a dlp tv could be the last tv you would need to buy. durable and nondeteriating display.


    better reference info.
    http://www.dlptvreview.com/dlptv/plasmatelevision.html


    Mike


    [Edited by mike015 on 03-13-2005 at 04:41 PM]

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