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  1. #1
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    Jul 2004
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    Victoria,Tx
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    Exclamation

    My compressor dome started leaking refrigerant. It was rust from moisture under the metal information tag on top of the compressor. I ground down all the rust, then heli-arced a 4"x4"x1/8 SS plate to the dome. Replace the drier, added 4oz. oil, evacuated and charged the unit. That was 3 years ago. At the plant these nomenclature plates are removed to prevent this type of corrision. We also have a real problem with corrision under insulation.



    [Edited by oroy54 on 03-09-2005 at 12:15 PM]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Cincinnati
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    Sounds like something I would do.

  3. #3
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    Oct 2004
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    Not recommended, but been there, done that.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Victoria,Tx
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    Hmm bwal2

    I was at first worried about degradation of the oil, but since the leak was on the dome, I said what the heck, the unit is only 10 yrs. old. Damn a poor man. Roy

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    Flowing nitrogen reduces oil degradation, and reduces explosion risk, but does not eliminate it.

    Long ago, I sawed a little compressor open to see what was rattling.
    It had a loose screw inside, so I tightened it up, then brazed the dome back on.
    It was still running & cooling when I got rid of it years later.

    I would not do or recommend such a thing today.
    Maybe I'm scared of dying.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Victoria,Tx
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    bawl2

    Hey that was great. I will find the time to cut a compressor in half myself! Thanks!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    Re: bawl2

    Originally posted by oroy54
    Hey that was great. I will find the time to cut a compressor in half myself! Thanks!
    Can I watch?

    Actually, cutting one open is not a bad thing to do.
    I routinely have my students take one apart every semester. Sometimes with a new one, sometimes with old.
    It does help with understanding the machinery.

    Putting a torch on one... nope.
    Just not a good idea.

    Oil + Heat + Oxygen = sad singin' & slow walkin'

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Grottoes VA
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    Originally posted by bwal2
    [B

    Long ago, I sawed a little compressor open to see what was rattling.
    It had a loose screw inside, so I tightened it up, then brazed the dome back on.
    It was still running & cooling when I got rid of it years later.

    [/B]
    How do you cut them open without getting shavings everywhere?

    I cut failures once and a while to see why they failed.
    Karst means cave. So, I search for caves.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    [QUOTE]Originally posted by karsthuntr
    How do you cut them open without getting shavings everywhere?
    Some compressors have a swaged, then welded, dome.
    If the swage is long enough, you can saw just through the outer layer, right beside the weld.
    The filings stay outside.

    Others have the half-domes turned out in a sort of flange.
    The weld can be ground off fairly easily.
    Drain the oil & flow nitrogen.
    I know a man that had one blow up in his hands.

    The weld can be cut on a lathe, if you know a machinist.
    That's how Trane does autopsies on warranty compressors.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
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    I feel sorry for that machinist! Them things are heavy enough to carry into the shop to cut, much less chuck up in a lathe. :-)

    One of these days I want to tear apart a compressor, just need a bit more free time.... and a compressor lol.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Victoria,Tx
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    Hmm The leak

    You know I dont think the leak would of ever happened if the sweating suction line wasn't passing right across the top of the compressor. Then the nomenclature plate location is still a bad design. This brings us back to a post a number of months ago about "Sweating compressors.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Victoria,Tx
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    Hmm The leak

    You know I dont think the leak would of ever happened if the sweating suction line wasn't passing right across the top of the compressor. Then the nomenclature plate location is still a bad design. This brings us back to a post a number of months ago about "Sweating compressors".

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    Buy it a nice long sleeve v-neck cardigan.

    Maybe that would help.

    My favorite was the AH model Tecumsehs with the suction line directly above the terminal cover.

    Dirty filter = Wet terminals.

    Nice!

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