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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    30

    Confused

    A buddy of mine went for an interview, been doing this type of work going on 8 years, and the guy that did the interview turned him down cause he didnt know what the melting point was for silver solder and soft solder, all I had to say was "what?". What do you guys make of this type of interview? Let me know the melting points. If i remember from school it is 1400 for Silver and around 400-500 for soft, right?

    -Buck

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    30
    See what I am talking about? 49 views and nobody knows what the melting point is of each of those metals. Yall had better learn this in school or get it off the box or something.

    -Buck

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Omaha, NE
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    1,561
    Here's what J.W. Harris says their melting points are:
    http://www.jwharris.com/jwref/chart/

    And here's a link that discusses liquidus and solidus:
    http://www.wallcolmonoy.com/TechServ...lid_Liquid.htm



    [Edited by snewman24 on 03-03-2005 at 11:53 AM]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    3,400
    According to AWS, you are soldering if your alloy melts below 840 F, and capillary action takes place.

    Brazing is above 840.

    What most people call "silver solder" is not actually a solder at all, at least around here.
    It is a brazing alloy, 45% is fairly common, with o% phosphorus. It is used for stainless to stainless, copper to steel, copper to brass, steel to steel, anything that can't stand phosphorus.

    A silver-phosphorus alloy is the most common thing we use.

    In order to know the exact melting point of any alloy, you would have to know the metals & percentages that make up the alloy in question, but 840 is the break-over point.

    See snewman's post for the link.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,174
    I tried to find out what the melting point was for my brazing rod today. I ruined my nice taylor thermometer .
    Saddle Up!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Clayton,NC
    Posts
    407
    I find that what they know isn't as important as the type of person they are. I ask very few HVAC questions when interviewing. I usually take them to lunch and talk with them while we eat. That's when I find out if they are smart, responsible,caring,out going..etc.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    30
    And Steve I bet that you have very good workers , too. I respect you for that. No BS i'm being serious!!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,841
    Originally posted by Buck2002
    A buddy of mine went for an interview, been doing this type of work going on 8 years, and the guy that did the interview turned him down cause he didnt know what the melting point was for silver solder and soft solder, all I had to say was "what?". What do you guys make of this type of interview? Let me know the melting points. If i remember from school it is 1400 for Silver and around 400-500 for soft, right?

    -Buck
    I think they just told him that so they could move on to the next guy.Melting point when my flame gets hot enough is that right?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,841
    Originally posted by stevehvac
    I find that what they know isn't as important as the type of person they are. I ask very few HVAC questions when interviewing. I usually take them to lunch and talk with them while we eat. That's when I find out if they are smart, responsible,caring,out going..etc.

    Hey stevehvac you sound like you would be a good guy to work for if you hire a installer soon let me know.I am make a thread late for work 6 years in the hvac field.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    3,400
    This line of questioning may have been an effort to see if the applicant could "think on his feet".

    However, if the applicant was not able to answer only THAT question, and did okay otherwise, I probably would have hired him.

    Never let them see you sweat...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,841
    Originally posted by bwal2
    This line of questioning may have been an effort to see if the applicant could "think on his feet".

    However, if the applicant was not able to answer only THAT question, and did okay otherwise, I probably would have hired him.

    Never let them see you sweat...

    If you get the job then always let them see you sweat.

    [Edited by framehvac on 03-03-2005 at 06:39 PM]

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    3,400
    Originally posted by framehvac
    Originally posted by bwal2
    This line of questioning may have been an effort to see if the applicant could "think on his feet".

    However, if the applicant was not able to answer only THAT question, and did okay otherwise, I probably would have hired him.

    Never let them see you sweat...

    If you get the job then always let them see you sweet.
    "sweat" or "sweet"?

    Two different things.

  13. #13
    I never asked anyone whom I hired, what the melting point was for anything.

    I was more interested if they had god character first. Once I got them on the job, I would quickly see whether or not they could work safely and use their hands as well as their minds.
    Once I discovered those findings ... THEN I could move on and judge whether or not they were any good as a tradesman/ mechanic ... but of course, this is just the way I do things!

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