Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1

    Question

    Hi there guys!

    Questions for the techs. My name is Jeremy and I live in Reno and I was just wondering what is the best route to take when it comes to gaining experience and knowledge in the HVAC trade,through a apprentice program or a tech school?

    A company wants me to come in and fill an application in my area and I have applied for others. Now, I dont mind starting at the bottom, whatever it takes to enter this trade, Ill do it, even if it pays close to minimum wage. Even if it takes 5 years to gain a certificate. I just dont want to spend 2 years investing money into classes, I would rather work from the bottom up even if it means working in the mud and cat $#^*!! LOL. Would I learn enough by taking this route?? What if I only gain experience in residential but nothing in commercial? Which kind of companies would I gain the most diverse experience and knowledge?

    Also, I notice some HVAC contractors which also provide plumbing services as well...which I admire because having an extra trade on their back must keep them very busy through out the year. What do you guys think about this?

    Anyways, thanks for reading my post and I look forward to any replies.

    Jeremy


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    66,818
    Go with the apprenticeship program.
    It includes schooling.
    A tech school alone is not enough.

    We have 2 techs with their Ass. degrees, its not the same as experence through an apprenticeship program.

    Plumbing, well,
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    192
    Try to get a job as a helper during the day, and go to school at night. Thats what i did.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    the Great Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    607
    Go with apprenticeship, best way to learn, and earn some money along with working into trade. Some companys will pay all or part of school if you get good grades.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    2

    Hmm

    Working on the job and going to school will give you the besr results. Think community college. I worked in the "Trade School" It is a big buiness. I have had many students that did well and some finished a long hard program and decided after $20,000 thay did not want to do the work.
    I went to community college and worked at the same time and loved to do the work. I was able to apply what I learned the next day in the field.

    Good Luck

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Slacking off right now
    Posts
    7,546
    in canada and other countries we go to school and work in the field at the same time its the best way
    www.vetopropac.com - The best tool bags on the market - The offical tool bag of choice by techs everywhere

    Arguing with some people is like wrestling a pig - eventually you realise the pig actually enjoys it

    Gonads serve a useful purpose but are no substitute for brains

  7. #7
    Originally posted by paully
    Working on the job and going to school will give you the besr results. Think community college. I worked in the "Trade School" It is a big buiness. I have had many students that did well and some finished a long hard program and decided after $20,000 thay did not want to do the work.
    I went to community college and worked at the same time and loved to do the work. I was able to apply what I learned the next day in the field.

    Good Luck
    This is the route I chose. It worked out fine for me. But we are not all alike.
    One Size does not Fit All.... now does it?

    If you are agressive and find a company with a great and gifted Mentor, then go com col and work during the day and make sure your Mentor meets with your instructor(s) regularly, as well as your employer.
    They should take a very pro-active role in your education. Otherwise, your dog food.

    A formal Mentor/ aprentice program, the kind unions used to use ... this is the best method overall.
    But then again, who wants to put up with the avarage union???

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    small island in the Pacific Ocean
    Posts
    558
    Like Penguin , I also went to a technical school and took a full time 2 year program that had 2 work co-ops, one of 6 months and one of 5 months. During the 3 in school terms you complete the academic requirement for the trade. The two years counts towards your apprenticeship, now I am just completing my final year of work and will write my TQ in the fall. I think both routes are good, it comes down to what works best in your situation and will get you where you want to be.

  9. #9
    Contact your local union regarding there programs.I did 2yrs at Tech school before going through the union program. The union program is much better, expeciality if you want commercial/industrial.

    Good Luck, Looks like you have the right attitude. Enjoy what you do and the money will follow.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event