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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Grottoes VA
    Posts
    5,856
    I'm sorry, I'll behave.
    Karst means cave. So, I search for caves.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    15
    heres an Idea if you have a electrostatic filter. Keep a pleated filter on hand and put it in place every time the filter is washed allowing the filter dry. A soapy cleanser should be used periodacally

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Philadelphia Pa.
    Posts
    461
    Wash an EAC in the dishwasher?????????

    Why yes. I wash my EAC cells in the dishwasher at the end of each month. It takes 30 minutes using the short cycle. I wash and rinse the pre-filters by hand in the sink. Takes 4 minutes.

    I let everything air dry after removing them and then place them back into the EAC. The owners manual seems to recommend this practice.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naples, Fla.
    Posts
    1,403
    Listen to BillVa.

    He is correct, the eltrostatic are too restrictive to air flow. Good for our business - bad for you. Yes - it is possible to add addtional returns w/ addtional eltrostatic to offset pressure drop but the products just are'nt functional.

    Go Aprilare 2200 / 2400 or electronic & get it over with.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    6,247
    Check the pressure drop over the filter if you think it is too restrictive.
    If the pressure drop exceeds 20% of the fans rated capacity then it is too restrictive.
    The ones that state they have increased surface area are usually the worst.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    534
    I know what they are git-r-done, we sell and install them.

    Jerrod, if you read the OM, you'll notice that they only require cleaning once every 4-6 months.
    "If you can't fix it, don't break it."

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Dothan, Al
    Posts
    3,453

    uconnputz

    This is how I show my customers what their thick, allergy or electrostatic filters are doing.
    First you need help. You stand where you can feel the airflow from a supply register. Have someone then remove the filter and notice if you can feel the difference in air flow. If you can, then the filter is slowing the air flow, which causes your system to run longer to heat or cool, which translates into a higher electric bill.
    Compound that with the cost of the electrostatic filter and the cost of operating your system has gone up. I would say that lowers your system efficiency.
    I have done this many times with customers.
    I also explain that if allergies are most important, then maybe filter should be used, but if costs are important ( over allergies ) use 'pleated' filter. The pleated filter not as thick as electro. or allergy.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    6,247

    Re: uconnputz

    Originally posted by bornriding

    I also explain that if allergies are most important, then maybe filter should be used, but if costs are important ( over allergies ) use 'pleated' filter. The pleated filter not as thick as electro. or allergy.
    If you install a filter that has a lot of restriction to airflow you will increase the amount of air that is being bypassed around that filter.
    Airflow will always take the least path of resistance.
    Why would it go through a restrictive filter when all blower access panels & filter racks leak like crazy?
    This will compound the problems that are already pre-existing.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,944
    As has been mentioned, the only way to be certain if a filter is too restrictive is to measure the pressure drop.

    I was surprized to find that a grossly oversized 90% electrostatic filter I put on one of my test furnaces for training created a 40% pressure drop. This was a 30x20 filter on a 600 cfm unit.

    Many of the system perfomance issues I have investigated are the result of air flow issues created by electrostatic filters. High temperature rise, frozen coils and erratic ECM blowers were among the most prevelant.

    If there is enough square inch space of any filter it can be used. Keep in mind that a filter works best the slower the air is moving through it. The less free area, the faster the air moves, the more dirt gets through.

    In one sense, electrostatic filters are bad for HVAC equipment because they are so good at preventing dirt from going through them. In that respect, if an electrostatic filter is good, then a piece of cardboard would be better.

    Please keep in mind that HVAC equipment air filtration is designed for one purpose; to keep the HVAC equipment clean. If you want to purify the air in your home using a central HVAC system you should by a self contained HEPA filter that draws air from the return across the HEPA filter and puts that same air back into the return without ever affecting the air flow of the HVAC system.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  10. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    southern illinois
    Posts
    5,522
    media replacement that i buy,has 3 sets of replacement in a package...

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    southern illinois
    Posts
    5,522
    i've got one job that customer requested these on and i am not a big fan of these either.....

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naples, Fla.
    Posts
    1,403
    MO-Flo, the data represented here is acurate. To keep it generic, yes the electrostatics stop debris - unfortunatly, you'll have to re-engineer the duct system & qty & size of all the RA's to overcompensate for thier unacceptable pressure drop.

    Keep in mind that accross the board w/ small deviations all product is designed to sustain a max static pressure @ .5"

    You will destory HX's, slug compressors, rust out air handlers and that's just before the mold starts to make a command appearance.

    We suggest the best application for them is our dumpster.

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    southern illinois
    Posts
    5,522
    yes i hear you....like i said i only done one job with these and that was by customers request....i am gonna just put plain janes in their place....and do like you guys do with dumpster action!!!

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