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  1. #1
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    Jan 2005
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    899
    When they went up there and were in the hot sunlight, where was the heat exchanged for cooling the suit?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    SE Michigan
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    Isnt it cold on the moon? I would think they would have to heat the suit.
    To put the world in order, we must first put the nation in order; to put the nation in order, we must put the family in order; to put the family in order, we must cultivate our personal life; and to cultivate our personal life, we must first set our hearts right.
    -- Confucius

  3. #3
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    Jan 2004
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    Good question. Not sure. I think the temp is controlled with a liquid circulation system stored in the back pack.
    A Diamond is just a piece of coal, that made good under pressure!

  4. #4
    Nitrogen,

    And the parachutes were for shade,

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    Zelienople, Pa
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    2,965
    They didn't have to worry about it on the Hollywood sound stage!
    How tall are you Private???!!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    496
    Temperatures on the Lunar surface vary widely on location. Although beyond the first few centimeters of the regolith the temperature is a nearly constant -35 C (at a depth of 1 meter), the surface is influenced widely by the day-night cycle. The average temperature on the surface is about 40-45 C lower than it is just below the surface.

    In the day, the temperature of the Moon averages 107 C, although it rises as high as 123 C. The night cools the surface to an average of -153 C, or -233 C in the permanently shaded south polar basin. A typical non-polar minimum temperature is -181 C (at the Apollo 15 site).

    The Lunar temperature increases about 280 C from just before dawn to Lunar noon. Average temperature also changes about 6 C betwen aphelion and perihelion.

    So objects can be extremly hot and extremly cold.


    To cope with the extremes of temperature, most spacesuits are heavily insulated with layers of fabric (Neoprene, Gore-Tex, Dacron) and covered with reflective outer layers (Mylar or white fabric) to reflect sunlight. The astronaut produces heat from his/her body, especially when doing strenuous activities. If this heat is not removed, the sweat produced by the astronaut will fog up the helmet and cause the astronaut to become severely dehydrated; astronaut Eugene Cernan lost several pounds during his spacewalk on Gemini 9. To remove this excess heat, spacesuits have used either fans/heat exchangers to blow cool air, as in the Mercury and Gemini programs, or water-cooled garments, which have been used from the Apollo program to the present.

    Just a copy/paste..I think they recycled the sweat to cool or blew it off.

    heres the "new" one http://www.nasatech.com/Briefs/June01/MSC22813.html





    [Edited by Spidy on 02-25-2005 at 09:56 PM]
    If I know I'm going Crazy,I must not be Insane

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Earth
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    Originally posted by BoltonNC
    They didn't have to worry about it on the Hollywood sound stage!
    and you may be part of the Matrix.
    A Diamond is just a piece of coal, that made good under pressure!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    12,077
    How smart do you have to be to be a friggin engineer that designs that stuff. Amazing stuff hey?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Florida's space coast
    Posts
    2,538
    I forgot.

    Was that on the light side or the" Dark Side of the Moon"?

    Love that song by Pink Floyd.
    We've been doing so much,for so long,with so little, that now we can do almost anything, with nothing at all.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,333
    we will find out in about 50 years

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Columbia, Mo GO, TIGERS
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    899
    insulation and reflectors to minimize heat gain, great. cooling fans in the suit, great. after much sweating, inside the suit would be saturated and that would subsequently not allow further sweat evaporation for cooling. hopefully the suit is sealed to vacuum (!) so no vapor could escape.

    so I gather they have circulating cold water. ok, so the water warms up eventually. heat flows from hotter to colder so how do they get the exchangers/radiators hotter than the 260 degree ambient? (for heat flow to occur) water at that temp becomes steam under pressure, right?

    now maybe if they compressed the vapor and directed it to a condenser/radiator?...I guess fans are zilch in a vacuum, though. without circulating air as a fluid flowing over the fins and tubes, heat transfer would be pitiful. the radiators would have to be huge, short of a large delta T. which has its own problems. what am I missing here?












    as an aside, I wonder what happens when they have to take a leak or drop a deuce?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Cincinnati
    Posts
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    Originally posted by BoltonNC
    They didn't have to worry about it on the Hollywood sound stage!
    I swear my old man used to say the same thing. He swore we never went into outer space.



    Yeah right. So explain to me how we get cheese then. Don't try the old Superman flys up there and gets it for us story. Oldman tried that one already.

    Scroll down to the "Moon statistics" it sure aint cold in the day but at night...... http://www.solarviews.com/eng/moon.htm

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Columbia, Mo GO, TIGERS
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    Hollywood sound stage? aw, who knows? Part of it looked like the desert maybe area 51 hah.
    That film by the Colliers "Was it Only a Paper Moon?" on whether the manned lunar missions were faked is thought-provoking.
    The dust rooster-tails kicked up by the lunar dune buggy are showing up on some TV commercial I have seen a couple times lately. In a vacuum the the dust would trace out a symmetric parabola but in that film it drops almost straight down. Looks like the dust is hitting air and decelerating.

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