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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Waffleville
    Posts
    10,339
    Quote Originally Posted by flange View Post
    how about this idea? you supply the local suppliers with jugs. They supply them to us fo' free, and take them back fo' free. any refrigerant inside the jugs gets reclaimed, and you split the profit from resale with the vendor. or how about another way? you buy delivery trucks that run a route, much like those pesky snap on guys. You bring fresh cylinders along with you to each stop, and exchange the clean ones for the ones filled with recovered gas. any profit made in doing so goes to you. Each shop would be visited say every two weeks or so, but could also call your guys' cell phone to do an emergency swap if needed, specifically during busy times when two weeks might not be enough.
    Wait, Brain fart. .....what if you could mass produce "refrigerant bags", liketrash bags only better. They come folded up real nice in boxes, and we carry them on the truck. We pay say....ten bucks a dozen. We recover the gas and press the little tab to identify what gas is inside. We then place them in "refrigerant recalamation dumpsters", located around our cities. you run a big old box truck and pick them up at each site. We actually pay you for the bags, and you keep the profits from reclamation. For any of these services to work, you also give us a "preferred" price on refrigerant purchases, say twenty percent off the going rate.
    yeah, that first part will never happen. somebody will screw up the equation. the distributor we take our tanks to say the fee is for storing the tanks (evidently they are taking up valuble space, which is why they always have to order the part i need today) and to pay for shipping the tanks out to the proper disposal facility, along with the time it takes the counter guy to fill out paperwork associated with the mess. blanket excuse to make money if you ask me. . .
    If Guns Kill People, Do Pencils Misspell Words?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=An2a1...eature=related

    Before we work on artificial intelligence why don't we do something about natural stupidity?

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Waffleville
    Posts
    10,339
    Quote Originally Posted by Abcohvacr View Post
    As a wholesaler, we exchange full recovery tanks for empty recovery tanks for a nominal fee per cylinder. Approx **** per 50# tank. The transaction is similar to an acetylene or nitrogen exchange. We would prefer to accept the full tanks only from customers that normally purchase their refrigerant from us. It doesn't really benefit us to accept tanks from anyone else. It's more of a convenience factor for our regular customers that we offer this service. There is no credit issued for the recovered refrigerant. We ship the full tanks off to a true "recovery center". I couldn't say what they do with it from there.

    No pricing in posts please.

    Thanks,

    Mod team
    is it a charge by the pound?

    are you charging for 50lbs? cause thats scandalous. . .

    Maximum allowable gross cylinder fill weight is 0.8 x water capacity x specific gravity of the refrigerant recovered at 75 degrees Fahrenheit / 25 degrees Celcius + the cylinder tare weight. . .

    actually max fill for any pressurized cyclinder is 80%
    If Guns Kill People, Do Pencils Misspell Words?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=An2a1...eature=related

    Before we work on artificial intelligence why don't we do something about natural stupidity?

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    7,326
    I will tell you what I see a lot. There is a nominal rebate on recovered refrigerant sent back for reclamation. This fee gets eaten up by wholesalers in conducting the business of exchanging tanks, cleanup fees, etc. Then, these "costs" get transeferred to the contractor, who in turn transfer them to end users. As I sit here and look through invoices, i see charges for "one shot recovery cylinders". You say well, duh, why are you buying one shotters. Simple, the local supplier doent have enough tanks to go around, especially when some contractors dont want to pay fees for cleanup etc, and either leave the cylinders in their trucks, or on jobsites. They got tired of buying tanks, and only have soo many, so they push the one shot deals. roughly thirty five bucks. buy a tank, resell it, and hand it back to the supplier of tanks. eff all that time spent tracking this stuff.

    Then sometimes tanks are available. there is the tank deposit, the tank cleanup fee (yes, i actually believe they cleanup every tank too, not), and the recovered refrigerant charge. Flat raters have nothing on this effort, so tracking the charges, deposits and returns etc is a pain. Scale your tank and tell me how much is in there, so i can bill you by the pound. Wait, isnt that your job? I already marked it on the box. But your refrigerant scale isnt accurate. So why do you sell them then?

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