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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    3

    Question

    Hello all.
    I'm hoping some of you may be able to enlighten me. I'll try to be as breif as possible.
    I'm trrying to decide on a HVAC system for the garage I've built. This is one area that I'm going to leave to the pro's because I don't have much experience in this area. I have built a 24' x 30' garage with a full 2'nd story that is going to be our rec room, half bath, kitchenette, and guest bedroom. I am ready to start the insulating and drywall, but I want to get central heat & a/c installed first. I can't seem to get a straight answer from the locals on which type of system to have installed or who to get to install it. Cost of instalation isn't a major factor, but I'm wondering if propane or electric would be the most economical to operate. We have propane in our home, but the fuel bills are really getting high. I hope this doesn't cause a major debate for you, but any reccomendations would be appreciated. We will only need the system for the upstairs, but having a little heat in the lower garage area would be nice too. Typical TN climate around here. Winters aren't too bad, but hot summer months. If any of you are in the Nashville area, I'd love a contactor referral on who to install me a system.
    Thanks guys!
    David

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    1,874
    I'd give some thought to a heat pump with a 90% gas unit as your back
    If you try to fail, and succeed.
    Which have you done ?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Maryland's Eastern Shore
    Posts
    892
    An electric heat pump would probably be the best solution... They are made for areas with mild winters and hotter summers...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,171
    Compare your LP cost to your KW.
    That will tell you which is cheaper to operate.
    Also, the garage can't be on the same system as the living area, with a air system, it in the code.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    3
    Man! Quick response, thanks. Wasn't expecting replys so fast. I gotta get to Church. Be back later. Thanks again!

    David

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    1,874
    Another option is a Ductless mini-split heat pump.
    I did one for a friend on his recroom above his garage.
    He just has a bath and a poker room,

    He's very pleased.
    It's quite, sleak and effective.
    Maybe add a set of logs for effect, and heat if you lose power.
    If you try to fail, and succeed.
    Which have you done ?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    the Great Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    607
    If your winters are mild a heatpump would make the most sense with electric strip heat for back up especially if you wont be keeping it conditioned all the time. Get the new honeywell touch screen thermostat with the outdoor sensor you can then lock out the strip heat above a specified outdoor temp. Ditto on the single system. Maybe a mini split or P-tac mounted high in the wall for garage area.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    3
    Thanks for the different options to consider. I see that I have some homework to do. Yes, the temps normally don't get below the mid 20's during the winter and not even that low very often. Considering the light use of it during the winter, I really don't need a huge system. Thanks again everybody. I'll check back in a few days. I drive a truck for a living, so I'm heading out in a few. Thanks again!

    David

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,042
    Heat pumps are cheap to run in Tennessee... winter electric rates are low, and the winters aren't too severe. They're pretty common there for just those reasons. The only drawback would be if it were a space that you didn't want to keep heated most all the time, since heat pumps lose their economy advantage when you ask them to heat up space quickly.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    the Great Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    607
    Originally posted by wyounger
    The only drawback would be if it were a space that you didn't want to keep heated most all the time, since heat pumps lose their economy advantage when you ask them to heat up space quickly.
    Get the new honeywell touch screen thermostat with the outdoor sensor you can then lock out the strip heat above a specified outdoor temp.

    wyounger would you not agree this would over come this disadvantage?

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