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Thread: 404a or R134???

  1. #14

    Re: Re: 404A or 134A

    Originally posted by jerrycoolsaz
    Originally posted by icehouse
    compressor oil boils at 200 microns).
    Where is this info from?
    I'll ask again.

  2. #15
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    Re : Compressor oil boils at 200 microns

    From Bill Schaffer on the Lennox Trainning video on system evacuation. This was the first time I ever heard of it myself.
    RAM Teaching Tomorrows Technicians Today.

  3. #16
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    Dec 2004
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    Dave Lennox must be rolling over (and laughing) in his grave.
    Be Careful, The Toes You Step On Today May Be Conected To The A$$ You Have To Kiss Tomorrow.

  4. #17
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    Talking 404a or134???

    oops ive been boiling the heck out of my oil,you can use 404a in med temp.applications
    if at first you dont succeed,then skydiving is not for you

  5. #18
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    Feb 2005
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    I regularly work on medium temp racks that run 404A. Tyler and Hussmann both use 404A in some med. temp racks. Just two examples.

    As was previously said in general R-12 has been replaced by 134A and R-502 by 404A. Didn't see a mention of 409A which is considered to be a drop in replacement for R-12. No TXV or cap change req'd. And compatible with the oil used in R-12 systems. Isn't HotShot 409A?

  6. #19
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    Red face Re Hot Shot

    409A and Hot Shot(414B) are two different Refrigerants thank you
    RAM Teaching Tomorrows Technicians Today.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    69

    Confused

    Not that this statement is going to help out this conversation, but I have info on "hotshot" that says that when you charge a system up your not suppost to "clear" the siteglass. go figure..that really doesn't make sense to me at all.

  8. #21
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    Re : Charging

    No matter which alternative Refrigerant you use, you charge 80% of the factory charge. Also these alternatives are near zeotropic mixture so you will have flashing in the sight glass
    RAM Teaching Tomorrows Technicians Today.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    200
    Unit was setup for a semi-hermetic and 404-a, The existing compressor was setup with poly oil. and Hotshot. I installed new filters both suction and liquid, flushed the system with FX11 and purged with nitrogen, Leak tested with nitrogen and R22. Evacuated to 500 microns, and used R404-a, and all is well... Down to 38 degrees.

  10. #23

    Re: Re : Charging

    Originally posted by icehouse
    No matter which alternative Refrigerant you use, you charge 80% of the factory charge. Also these alternatives are near zeotropic mixture so you will have flashing in the sight glass
    The reason for bubbles in glass is cuz you're actually shortcharging the unit. And actually if you have glass, you have a TXV, which means you have a receiver, which means you should have a solid column. Adjust your TXV clockwise (increase superheat) for the drop-in you are using. Change powerheads, whatever. And before anyone gives me ****, it's worked for years for us with fewer comp failures than others.
    With cap tubes you still have to shortcharge it.


  11. #24
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    Re: Re: Re : Charging

    Originally posted by jerrycoolsaz
    Originally posted by icehouse
    No matter which alternative Refrigerant you use, you charge 80% of the factory charge. Also these alternatives are near zeotropic mixture so you will have flashing in the sight glass
    The reason for bubbles in glass is cuz you're actually shortcharging the unit. And actually if you have glass, you have a TXV, which means you have a receiver, which means you should have a solid column. Adjust your TXV clockwise (increase superheat) for the drop-in you are using. Change powerheads, whatever. And before anyone gives me ****, it's worked for years for us with fewer comp failures than others.
    With cap tubes you still have to shortcharge it.


    No one should give u any "****". In the first place "You can't argue with success". In the second place in the 40 some years i've been in this field I have never found an expansion valve that worked properly without a full column of liquid entering it.
    If you really know how it works, you have an execellent chance of fixin' er up!

    Tomorrow is promised to no one...

  12. #25
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    Dec 2003
    Location
    Lafayette, Ind.
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    System proulby used R-12, check TXV, it should give you an indecation. For R-12 I sub R-409a It will mix with polyester, minural or alkabenzene oil.
    Good luck

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    69

    Re: Re: Re: Re : Charging

    Originally posted by rayr
    [i]

    No one should give u any "****". In the first place "You can't argue with success". In the second place in the 40 some years i've been in this field I have never found an expansion valve that worked properly without a full column of liquid entering it. [/B]
    ...........So, I guess when it comes to these new refrigerants we should throw away the old rule book. Yes, there should be a full column of liquid refrigerant going to the txv, atleast with R22,R12,R502 etc. All the original refrigerants.

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