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Thread: labor rate

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    56
    Hello everyone.
    I don't know if I can ask this particular question. I hope someone reads this.

    What is the going hourly rate for a service tech? I mean how much is the labor/hour for a tech to come out and service a heater? I understand that it is labor PLUS parts.

    Thank you.
    Again I'm not sure if I can ask this question.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    chicago suburbs
    Posts
    4,422
    i make $6.75/hr. can i come out and work on your stuff?
    FILL OUT YOUR PROFILE!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    56
    LOL LOL TINN I have PLENTY of those guys around here. Still lol lol

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    3,182
    The rates will vary by quite alot, dependant upon the area. Call around to a few of your local contractors and ask for their hourly rate.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,118
    From one end of the country to the other, hourly rate can vary by close to a hundred bucks an hour.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    4,970
    Hourly rate......was I supose to be making money? Thought I was doing something wrong and was beginning to think this was a non profit oganazation.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon
    Posts
    1,209
    Some companies charge a time and materials rate while others charge flat rate pricing. What determines a companies rates depends on how they do business. Do they charge enough to cover expenses or do they try to be the lowest. Their are numerous factors that come into play i.e. actual labor plus benefits, vehicle expenses building expenses office help etc. etc ect. Will the company that low balls be in business in the next 5,4,3,2,1 years? Probably not. Look at it this way, we must make money or why be in business. It does seem like a charity at times but hey, other times we actually make money (what a concept). Being a student as your profile states you can figure the average wage of a journeyman with benefits is around 30-40 an hour thats fully loaded, then add on your needed percentage to keep the lights on and all the rest of the the requirements of being in business. Good luck and hope this helps somewhat. Michael
    Proud supporter of Springfield Millers and Oregon Ducks.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,415
    With out giving prices, my company has an hourly rate that we go by, but there's also bit rates, and "good guy" hourly rates. They vary 30% roughly. But heck since we're throwing numbers out there, our hourly rate is roughly 300-400% more than what the average wage (of journeymen, not counting apprentices). But that's a whole other thread lol

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    47
    If you are working for some one else, it will be what you are worth to them. How tight the labor market is, how qualified you are, and how you present your self to your employer. There is really much more, but I hope you see how it works.
    If you are self employed, then it get really important that you do the figures & math.
    Overhead, -- phone, pager, cell phone, office, (even if you
    work out of your home. Insurance, (business
    liability) electricity, depritation of equip.
    uniforms, shoes, computer, office furniture,
    state taxes, federal taxes, fica, freight,
    tools, (they wear out & get lost) bad debt,
    (guess who use to pay well, but now you can't
    find them) state license, city license, county
    license, schools, (you have to stay up on the
    new stuff.) attorney, accountant, *the list
    goes on*
    vechicle, insurance, fuel, tires, oil changes, repairs,
    (it will break down, & evidentily wear out)

    add all these up, make sure you don't miss any thing. add your salary for a year (what you want to make in order to live a life of reasonable comfort, provide health insurance for your family, two weeks vacation,
    project your repairs to your vechicle for next 12 months,
    tool replacelments, etc. add 20% for safety.(if you are lucky, you won't miss it more that 20%). Divide this total $ amount by the number of hours you will actually work in an year. [self employed usually work 10 hrs. day x 6 days, x 50 weeks, = 3000 hrs.
    [2000 hrs. if your don't work more than 8 hrs. five days per week.] this will give you your "break even" charge by the hour. You can survive, but will not be putting anything away for replacment of that truck/computer, etc. when they out. You won't be putting anything away for college, vacations, health emergencies, retirelment, etc. Don't get me wrong. There are thousands out in the business doing well. Just do the homework before you go out on your on. Have enought cash put back to break even the first couple of years, in case all of a sudden business drops off.
    or your get sick/hurt and can't work for a while. The national failure rate is, only one in five business will still be operation in five years. Good luck.

  10. #10
    It all depends ,

    It breaks down somewhere along these lines,

    Residential averages out at about 65 dollars an hour with the average ten year tech making approx 20 an hour + benefits

    Light commercial averages out at about 60 an hour and the ten year tech makes about 25 an hour + benefits

    Larger commercial, Industrial averages about 95 an hour the journey makes 31 an hour + union benefits and some extras usually. ( 45 total package )

    DDC controls bills out at about 110, the tech averages about 28 + benefits

    The techs that can do DDC and the mechanical service competantly. Maintain their own accounts and get no complaints average about thirtyfive + their union benefits

    The Union rate here is 31 the 35 is to keep the good ones.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Zelienople, Pa
    Posts
    2,965
    Originally posted by fat eddy
    It all depends ,

    It breaks down somewhere along these lines,

    Residential averages out at about 65 dollars an hour with the average ten year tech making approx 20 an hour + benefits

    Light commercial averages out at about 60 an hour and the ten year tech makes about 25 an hour + benefits

    Larger commercial, Industrial averages about 95 an hour the journey makes 31 an hour + union benefits and some extras usually. ( 45 total package )

    DDC controls bills out at about 110, the tech averages about 28 + benefits

    The techs that can do DDC and the mechanical service competantly. Maintain their own accounts and get no complaints average about thirtyfive + their union benefits

    The Union rate here is 31 the 35 is to keep the good ones.
    Jesus Fat Eddy, break the MAIN RULE of the site why don't you...
    How tall are you Private???!!!!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    2,635
    You're right fats. It does depend. The home warranty company that I work for pays more than that per hour. And don't get me started on the internal hourly rate of flat rate companies. Take your number and multiply it by two or three. But then again, a piece of crap starter house costs a half million out here. So who can blame them?

    I need a drink... err, drinks.

  13. #13
    The rates I showed were for Ohio at least the northern part, I didn't know the rules, nothing wrong with putting everything above the table they know we make a living.

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