Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Filters

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bakersfield, CA
    Posts
    209
    I have read quite a few disparaging remarks concerning the standard 1" filters most of us consumers use. I've also read (on this site) a few comments that more expensive filtering systems don't really do much better than their cheaper cousins. I would appreciate your views on what would constitute a good filtering system (cost vs. benefit)on a new split system in new construction.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Derby City
    Posts
    3,960

    Hmm

    Most important is what you are wanting to achieve with the filtering system. Are there allergy or respiratory concerns? Or do you just want something better than the 1" throw-away? The maintenance of and regular replacement of any type filter is most important regardless of the type that is installed.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bakersfield, CA
    Posts
    209

    Reduction of allergens and dust would be great. No specific respiratory issues.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Derby City
    Posts
    3,960
    The key obviously is maintenance of the system whether $1.50 throw-aways or $1000 hepa systems. If you plan on being in the home for some time, then investing in a good electronic air cleaner would probably be your best bet. You can also incorporate UV lighting into the system as an added benefit against allergens. I have personally used, throw away, media, and eac's and have seen and felt the best result with the eac. Most eac's operate on the same principle with pre-filters to catch any large particles and the "collector cells" that utilize an ionization process of trap air borne particulants. Be sure the builder or hvac contractor cleans the eac before you take possession of the home. (hopefully not too late) During the final steps in new construction, a lot of drywall dust and debris winds up in the system. I also recommend a complete and thorough duct cleaning be performed before taking possession. When I was actively involved in RNC, we had our duct cleaning department provide a complete duct cleaning of the system as part of our close out process. We would also leave extra filters unless it was an EAC or Hepa type. HEPA is pretty much the top of the heap, and there are definite benefits to this type of filter system. But EAC is more "middle of the road" and probably gives you the benefit equal to the investment. Keep in mind, if the EAC will be located close of living space, you may hear the occassional "tic or snap" associated with the EAC. Also, the EAC should NEVER be on unless your indoor fan is on. And, if there is any propensity toward an allergy to Ozone, then an EAC should probably be avoided. Although it emits very small levels, if someone in the home is sensitive to this, it might aggravate the condition. In that case, a media type filter would be appropriate. Hope this helps.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    I don't know
    Posts
    2,903
    Just note that EACs need to be cleaned very frequently to achieve half-decent efficiency. The performance deteriorates rapidly as the cells get dirty. After a month they work no better than a 50-cent fiberglass filter.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bakersfield, CA
    Posts
    209
    Thank very much for the information. I'll look into an EAC and also make sure the contractor cleans the EAC and ducts before we take possession.
    Thanks again.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event