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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    51
    irascible
    very lowly of a typical utility man's skills unless you point out where the crack is
    i guess your waiting for them to write some kind of violation so you can get a second opinion to install a new furnace?

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Yo.... Here!, I'm right here..
    Posts
    6,236
    gn

    Anybody in the K.C. area do side work that could beat this price?
    No dumb questions??????????? well maybe not, but this is definetly insulting, to the contractors in your area, and you are asking someone to be deceitful to their employer, their fellow employees and the industry

    And buying a custom furnace replacement IS NOT like buying a CAR!!!!!!

    A Ford from one dealer is the same as a Ford from another dealer.

    No two installs are alike.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    2,635
    If you were to say that the typical HVAC contractor is a hack, I would be surprised if you got much disagreement from the contractors on this board. And while someone would inevitably take offense, that someone would have a very narrow and unrealistic view. I have seen what my fellow tradesmen do as a matter of course. The bulk of it isn't pretty. Most contractors here know it. And most of the contractors here are the exception to that rule.

    The same goes for the typical PG&E tech that makes housecalls. They may be the nicest guys in the world. But by and large they don't have sufficient training to be handling funaces. If after reading all the technical data that gets flung around here a PG&E tech still doesn't know that, then he has a very narrow and unrealistic view in my opinion.

    My comment was not aimed at the exceptions to the rule, hence the word "typical". There ARE some very talented PG&E techs, I know. If you or whoever happens to be one of them then God bless. I tell my customers that like anything else, calling PG&E out is a risk. They may get good. They may get bad. If they get bad, say goodbye to their gas valve. A combustible gas leak detector in the wrong hands means trouble. By law gas valves are ALLOWED to leak to the manifold. I informed a PG&E boss of that fact and he cared not one wit. He had his policies and reality was irrelevant to them.

    All of that is just my opinion, of course. Feel free to flame me to a crisp if you desire. But it will be a one man flame war. I won't be participating. People can criticize my trade all they want and I don't take it personal because I'm confident of my skills. This will be my last reply in this thread. My e-mail is posted if you want to continue the discussion. And my phone number is too if you really want to have a discussion. If so, keep the profanities to a minimum please.

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Puyallup,WA.
    Posts
    51
    Originally posted by nehps
    Iam getting sooooooooo tired of hearing about us being expensive, money, money, money, .
    I gotta good one for you,

    Last summer I had a customer want to switch from water to remote air cooled condensing (using too much water) I lost the job to a hack around 7000 less than me, anyway all said and done the customer got a condensing unit sized for half of what they needed so they still had to use water, there goes the new system paying for itself now you need to pump water and run fans.

  5. #31

    Talking Money Money

    Here's a good one for Money Money...

    Had my water pumped changedout today at the Dodge dealer a whooping $756.00 ( V10 Egine ) While I was there rescued the sales department from a hot week end...

    Did a compressor change out 5 ton scroll.... General Manager made me a deal , shaved off some $$$$ on that water pump... The $756.00 price was the discoutned price...

    5 ton Scroll change out, $1,140.00 plus the $350.00 they over charged me inthe service department and were all happy...
    AllTemp Heating & Cooling

  6. #32
    SURVEY

    Has anyone ever actually tried to use a bottle of water to check a heat exchanger, I've got to tell you that I have never heard of that before and when I did I found it very amusing that a competitor is out there trying to do that. within a few seconds of reading it I thought of at least fifty reasons why that was a bad Idea and only one reason that it might be a good Idea but I don't think that washing the outside of a heat exchanger is a necessary task.

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    501
    Originally posted by fat eddy
    SURVEY

    Has anyone ever actually tried to use a bottle of water to check a heat exchanger, I've got to tell you that I have never heard of that before and when I did I found it very amusing that a competitor is out there trying to do that. within a few seconds of reading it I thought of at least fifty reasons why that was a bad Idea and only one reason that it might be a good Idea but I don't think that washing the outside of a heat exchanger is a necessary task.
    Do a search for it on the boards. A lot of people use it, and have had good success with it.

  8. #34
    That is unbeleivable,

    Please explain to me how that would have a prayer of working and then I will tell you how that is not possible. I suppose it could work if there were a gaping hole in an exchanger ( which would not need a test ) but to find a crack!!! How is this possible ? What do you do with the water that you just poured onto the blower ? How do you get the exchanger to suck the water in ? This is as ridiculous as a smoke test. Just suffice it to say that you can tell every home owner that there is a 90% probability that there exchanger is cracked and you would not be lying about it.

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    7
    The test is simple, there always areas of the heat exchangers you can't visually inspect. I've used this method dozens of times and it always works. You always take the blower wheel out and set it to the side, no reason to get water in there.

    I've used a squirt bottle, i find it works best, but you basically put water on top the lungs, it runs down the side's and bleeds through any cracks. This test works great for older furnaces, and when you find a crack, you can tell the customer to keep an eye on the inside of the lung, then do the water test and show them where the water is bleeding through. On large crack you'll always have a pool of water sitting inside the lung.

    I've done other test's too, but i'm satisfied with this one, and i'm suprised if you've never done this test, its a common practise in our area amoung techs.

  10. #36
    Not trying to be disrespectful but I would think that if I were going to cut a hole in a plenum then remove the blower assembly to find a crack I suppose I would just use a flashlight at that point and look up from the bottom and down from the top.

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    956
    Originally posted by fat eddy
    Not trying to be disrespectful but I would think that if I were going to cut a hole in a plenum then remove the blower assembly to find a crack I suppose I would just use a flashlight at that point and look up from the bottom and down from the top.
    How you going to see the crack on a duracurve?

    Water is a great way to find the crack on those

  12. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,157

    FAT EDDY IS RIGHT

    Cracks in heat exchangers are over rated nearly all heat exchangers are cracked, if you pull ten heat exchangers out of furnaces that have run for two or more seasons I will assure you that nine of them will have at least one crack in them. As for the price that guy gave you just get some more bids and compare at that point I would also have someone look at the furnace again and ask him to show you the cracks. Seven thousand dollars for a furnace does sound like a bit much if it were the whole system he might be in the ballpark.

    All that carbon monoxide stuff is a bunch of bull-
    carbon monoxide is just a selling tool to scare people isnt it eddie

    Eddie , I am sure you have spent years in the heating busniess and that you actually do believe in what you have said
    All you are doing is reinforcing the posters beliefe that his furnace needs no repairs and in doing so your advice will cause these people a great deal of harm or death.

    The people that post here are not in busniess to cheat anyone, they know the busniess well and really do take pride in what we do , so please , so some where else to give your opinions. we are stating facts , we do not cheat people,we are in this busniesss to help and have return customers

    you would be surprised at how much you can learn here from experts

  13. #39
    Ok,

    I'm a little confused should I tell the truth or should I hide the truth to protect the homeowner. I really don't care about the homeowner.

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