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Thread: HVAC resources?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1
    Hi. I am new to the HVAC field. I spent three months as a purchasing agent for a heating company, and am now in the field. I like knowing as much as I can about the things I do, so I was hoping I could gather some resources for my new career. I'll basically be doing new construction and residential replacement, so anything along those lines would be fantastic. In the last three days I've helped hang a unit heater, watched while my lead man did some service-type work, and set two a/c's. I am a helper learning the trade and would just like to accelerate my learning curve. I know that there is no teacher like experience, but I feel that the more I know the more likely it is that my lead man will feel confident in allowing me those experiences more quickly. I looked high and low for a basic "how-to" guide on setting a/c's and furnaces, but so far have struck out. If anyone can lend a hand, it would be much appreciated. I hope to soon become a lead man myself and help mentor young men (and possibly women) in this field. Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naples, Fla.
    Posts
    1,403
    Field experiance is a great learing tool, assuming you have a truely educated and sharing mentor.

    But this is no substitute for hitting the books in a local trade school. Todays systems require more than knowing how to change a belt.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,841
    Try a hvac book but the best way to learn is do it when you get done with one thing ask what do you won't me to do next this will show that you won't to learn & most guys will take you under there wing.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    Contact your distributor and see what classes he has scheduled and attend every one.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,579


    You are simply not going to learn all that you need to know on the job. You need an instructor. Enroll in technical school.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,841
    If you are looking at a service tech job go to school if you are looking at a installer job you can learn it as a helper just work hard.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    68,789
    You need both school, and field.

    And don't expect to be mentoring helpers in the near future, this isn't a trade that you can learn in a year.

    Weather you want to do install only, service only, or both, do alot of searhes on this board, and you'll discover that we all ask questions sooner, or later, no matter how long we've been in the trade.

    I'm on my 30th year, and I still go to seminars and classes.

    Good Luck, and stick with it.
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    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,579


    "There is no substitute for experience and experience is no substitute for study"

    Norm Christopherson




  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    west chester pa
    Posts
    343
    You need to screw uo and have the lead man make you fix it. pay attentiona and ask alot of questions

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,579
    Originally posted by pipedope
    You need to screw uo and have the lead man make you fix it. pay attentiona and ask alot of questions

    That is the hard way to learn. It is easier to learn the right way from a seasoned instructor than learn by your mistakes. I prefer to learn the principles behind how it works and aviod as many mistakes as possible. We all mess up enough without making that our primary method of learning!

    There is nothing like learning the principles of physics, mechanics and electricity first and then applying them properly and avoiding the problems as much as possible.

    Nothing beats a good combination of study and application.

    Norm


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    39

    training

    Recommend some good hvac textbooks, such as ones produced by Goodheart-wilcox publishers, ESCO institute books, look on amazon under hvac books. There are lots of titles and yes as other have stated you need practical and theory. Start with the basics and build from there.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,579


    Here is my recommended book list:

    http://www.bacharach-training.com/norm/recommended.htm

    Plus of course, my own book "Pal's HVAC Tech Certification Guide" advertised at the top of HVAC talk's page.

    Norm

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    39

    books

    recently also purchased and read the volumes 1,2,3 of the Audel hvac fundamentals. found them very helpful and for the price affordable for the information contained in them.

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