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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    Columbia, Mo GO, TIGERS
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    which is heavier, air or carbon monoxide? (actually I guess the proper question is which is denser) don't know where to look it up and getting different answers depending who gets asked...thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
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    1,874
    I can't remember the source but, I remember it as being heavier(more dense)
    I'm sure someone will come up with a link to say yeh or neh.
    If you try to fail, and succeed.
    Which have you done ?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
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    6,137

    specific gravity

    About 0.9 so therefore slightly lighter than air. HTH

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    20

    co is lighter han air

    carbon monoxide is slightly lighter than air so it is important when we install co detectors that they are no higher than 6 feet on the wall. Because co rises slowly, and if you have it on the ceiling you have been exposed for a period of time.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Westlake, Ohio
    Posts
    2,470
    Carbon Monoxide is always lighter than air down to 32 degrees. Plus it come out of the appliance hot which would put it at the ceiling first. Warmest air in the room is at the ceiling therefore it would linger there the longest. What is often forgotten is that if CO is dumping into the building even greater amounts of CO2(Carbon Dioxide) are being emitted. Carbon Dioxide is 40% heavier than air and ends up on the floor rapidly. This could actually prevent CO from getting to an alarm if it is plugged in at a low wall outlet.
    captain CO

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    4,264
    Second link listed on Google search "Carbon monoxide density." http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasc.../chem03364.htm
    There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action....Mark Twain

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Westlake, Ohio
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    2,470
    Originally posted by HVAC Pro
    Second link listed on Google search "Carbon monoxide density." http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasc.../chem03364.htm
    Other than the molecular weights, most of the statements made are wrong when it comes to even diffusion. The last guy said put the alarm close to what you want to protect therefore his is mounted at waist level. His priorities may be slightly different than mine.
    captain CO

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    6,247
    Originally posted by Jim Davis
    Originally posted by HVAC Pro
    Second link listed on Google search "Carbon monoxide density." http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasc.../chem03364.htm
    Other than the molecular weights, most of the statements made are wrong when it comes to even diffusion. The last guy said put the alarm close to what you want to protect therefore his is mounted at waist level. His priorities may be slightly different than mine.
    Would it be safe to say what he is thinking with?

  9. #9
    CO is slightly lighter, but because they are so close together they mix together very well.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,666
    Originally posted by supremehvac
    CO is slightly lighter, but because they are so close together they mix together very well.
    This is probably the most correct answer yet.

    Carbon monoxide has a density(lb/cu.ft.) of .078033. Nitrogen has a density of .075261. The amount of oxygen in the air is related to how much is being displaced by the carbon monoxide. Oxygen has a density of .089207.
    With no carbon monoxide typically the nitrogen makes up 79% of the air and oxygen makes up slightly less than 21%. Other pollutants make up a tiny fraction of 1%.
    All of these gasses mix very well in the air.

    Density info taken from "Pocket Ref" compiled by Thomas J. Glover. Second Edition. Sequoia Publishing Inc. Littleton, Colorado, USA.


    [Edited by oil lp man on 02-05-2005 at 02:23 PM]

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Westlake, Ohio
    Posts
    2,470
    The most correct answer comes from field testing not a book. CO is always higher on the second floor of a house than the first floor. CO is always higher at the ceiling than at the floor.
    A book fact is that R-22 is heaver than air. How does it destroy the ozone layer?
    captain CO

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
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    2,666
    thermal updrafts.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    2,729
    Originally posted by Jim Davis
    Carbon Monoxide is always lighter than air down to 32 degrees. Plus it come out of the appliance hot which would put it at the ceiling first. Warmest air in the room is at the ceiling therefore it would linger there the longest. What is often forgotten is that if CO is dumping into the building even greater amounts of CO2(Carbon Dioxide) are being emitted. Carbon Dioxide is 40% heavier than air and ends up on the floor rapidly. This could actually prevent CO from getting to an alarm if it is plugged in at a low wall outlet.
    If all the CO goes to the ceiling and all the CO2 goes to the floor, I'm glad I'm the right height to be breathing the O2 in the middle. No wonder I pass out when I lay down.

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