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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Waco, Texas, USA
    Posts
    6,153
    http://accagh.org/

    Click on Tips

    Scroll down to where it says "avoid heating unused areas".

    This is terrible information provided by the U.S. Department of Energy
    "And remember my sentimental friend......that a heart is not judged by how much you love, but by how much you are loved by others" - Wizard of Oz.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,195
    Like every room has it's own sealed envelope...Sheesh.
    "That's good enough..." usually isn't.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Houston,Tx.
    Posts
    15,959
    Avoid heating unused areas by closing off
    unoccupied rooms and shutting off heating
    vents.

    Yes, and when it trips the high limit call one of our listed members to come out and repair it for you.
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    “Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards". - Vernon Law

    "Never let success go to your head, and never let failure go to your heart". - Unknown

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    Maybe they are assuming all the rest of the vents are oversized, after all... isnt everything bigger in Texas?

    C'mon guys since when has the DOE had the HVAC business or human comfort in their interest? Never. Remember these are the folks that told elderly people to set their thermostat to 68 in the winter to save energy. It didnt matter that thousands died from it. Besides, how many HO's read the houston's chapter of Acca's web site?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    In fairness, they did say not to do it if you have a heat pump system.

    Also, they are serving the Houston area. In this part of the world all our ductwork is sized for cooling. If you have a properly sized gas furnace, the duct system is very oversized for heating, so it is actually OK to shut down a couple of unused rooms. Not that a gas or electric furnace really runs enough in this part of the world to save much energy that way...

    Question for docholiday, how did setting thermostats to 68 cause thousands of people to die? It is a commonly recommended and used thermostat setting for heating...
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Derby City
    Posts
    3,963
    Mark, was that a rhetorical reference about duct sizing in that part of the world? If not, I think I am correct in stating that ALL ductwork is sized for cooling. Gee, do you think maybe DOE and/or public utilities DON'T have either the HO or our interests in mind? In the early to mid-70s there was a moratorium placed on all new natural gas service, forcing the broader use of heat pumps. It coincided with a new construction boom, so most if not all new houses built during that time were totally electric. Only several years later was it revealed that our natural gas reserves were at the highest level ever when the stop was put on new gas services. Market manipulation? Hey, if you ever make a career change, remember these two trades: insurance & public utilities. No lose. If you even THINK you're not going to make your projections for the upcoming year, you go to the powers that be, apply for, and usually get a rate increase in ANTICIPATION of increased costs. I love it when the utility company raises the rates by 25%, then later comes back and pats themselves on the back for a 10% decrease. They ignore the fact that the net result is a 15% increase! I envy the areas that have separate electrical and gas utilities. Usually they will compete for business, but here, there are one in the same. Don't like their rates, no problem, they just pull the plug!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    be patient, BigBrother | government will take care of you [r paycheck! ]

    what do you expect from a bunch of burecrats? their goal is to enact more rules which require more burecrats to enforce, more of their managers, bigger buildings, more lawyers to interpet, ...

    BTW, when do you normally turn on your central unit? my house finally drifted down to 47F with outdoor temp @17F overnight. 57F with 46F yesterday. 2133sf, trilevel.

    [Edited by cem-bsee on 02-03-2005 at 07:48 AM]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    The DOE no longer asks for 68 in heating. Elderly Americans who's circulatory systmes are reduced are subject to hypothermia in conditions you and I might feel comfortable at. These, at the time were the WWI and WWII die hard americans who did everything uncle sam asked them to. After a significant increase in hypothermia related deaths was noticed the DOE quit suggesting 68. After that blunder, they developed minimum efficiency standards in an effort to reduce gas consumption.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304

    History

    >>In the early to mid-70s there was a moratorium placed on all
    >>new natural gas service, forcing the broader use of heat pumps.

    Was this supposed to be a federal rule, or a state one? Could you possibly provide a link to document this. I was in Texas and remember blackouts due to natural gas shortages, directly caused by Oscar Wyatt's Coastal Corporation breaking its supply contracts. I remember a federal rule banning new construction of gas fired boilers (e.g. power plants) but don't remember any such rule about residences.

    >>It coincided with a new construction boom, so most if not all new houses built during that time were totally electric.

    Hmmmm. I worked 15 years for the electric utility in Houston and that never got talked about. We were especially hard hit by the ban on natural gas power plants, the result was the utility's 1st ever nuke and 1st ever coal plant.

    >>Only several years later was it revealed that our natural gas reserves
    >>were at the highest level ever when the stop was put on new gas services.

    Again, please document where you got this. I remember it differently, would hate to be taught Dale Gribble history <g>.

    Regards -- P.Student

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    Originally posted by irishmist
    Mark, was that a rhetorical reference about duct sizing in that part of the world? If not, I think I am correct in stating that ALL ductwork is sized for cooling.
    I would imagin that in some places, the duct system would need to be sized for heating because the heating airflow requirement is actually higher than is required for the cooling...
    In this part of the world, there is a large difference in the airflow needed for cooling, and what is needed for heating. So in a place like Houston, if your furnace is properly sized, it won't hurt anything to shut down a couple of rooms.
    In many parts of the country there isn't as great a difference between heating and cooling airflow, so it would be bad to shut off airflow to rooms like they recommended.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Derby City
    Posts
    3,963
    Perpetual: sorry. The situation I refer to occurred here in the Ohio Valley. This is one of the reasons I made the earlier request for locations for those of you who are regular contributors. I have now put together a data base with the information you guys provided so I can quickly see where you are. Obviously, our local utilities handle these fuel "crises" differently.

  12. #12

    Re: History

    Originally posted by perpetual_student
    >>In the early to mid-70s there was a moratorium placed on all
    >>new natural gas service, forcing the broader use of heat pumps.

    Was this supposed to be a federal rule, or a state one? Could you possibly provide a link to document this. I was in Texas and remember blackouts due to natural gas shortages, directly caused by Oscar Wyatt's Coastal Corporation breaking its supply contracts. I remember a federal rule banning new construction of gas fired boilers (e.g. power plants) but don't remember any such rule about residences.

    >>It coincided with a new construction boom, so most if not all new houses built during that time were totally electric.

    Hmmmm. I worked 15 years for the electric utility in Houston and that never got talked about. We were especially hard hit by the ban on natural gas power plants, the result was the utility's 1st ever nuke and 1st ever coal plant.

    >>Only several years later was it revealed that our natural gas reserves
    >>were at the highest level ever when the stop was put on new gas services.

    Again, please document where you got this. I remember it differently, would hate to be taught Dale Gribble history <g>.

    Regards -- P.Student
    The best that I remember those where local (utility based?) bans.

    I built my house in 79 in the Kansas City area. There was talk then of a new consstruction ban, but never happened.

    But in Lousiville they did have a ban. People where buy old houses for the meter rights. Then selling then and the next owner got stuck with a house without gas. It did not last long.

    IIRC it was not a shortage of NG, but shortage of pipelines.


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304

    Wild

    Wow. That is wild stuff that I had never heard before. I do remember it as a time of crazy ideas.

    Not to defend the DOE or anything.

    Thank you -- P.Student

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