clocking meter
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Thread: clocking meter

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    148
    Here's the deal I have a customer that is heating his garage with a natural gas hanging unit heater. He is very concerned about his gas bill this last month. How can I find out how much gas this unit would burn in a 24hr. period.

    unit heater 60mbh input,
    48mbh output,
    1.1137 gas pressure factor,
    1.0058 BTU factor

    Any help with this would be great.

    Thanks, helgy


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,458
    clock the input first. test hand value X movement X time
    sample 1/2 x 19/10 x 60/1== 57342 you mentioned this is not @ 7''w.c but 1.1137 lbs?? If this is so than you must use multiplier and that depends upon area. We use 14.95 here 14.95 + 1.1137 divided by 14.95= 1.07 x57342=61356
    I think I got that right. Going from memory ands its been a while. Make sure you check test hand and count number of divisions (some have 8) 1/2 is test hand value 19/10 is the numer of divisions hand went in 60 seconds thus 60/1

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Gilroy, Calif
    Posts
    188
    Hi mike. I was just reading this and trying to decipher a response. pounds pressure! must be a big garage.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,458
    Hi Gary. How close was I?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Gilroy, Calif
    Posts
    188
    Not sure mike. I'm going to look that one up in the morning. The pounds pressure is throwing me alittle. Whats up with the mbh rating? That stands for million pounds an hour, doesn't it? Must be a RRRRRREEEEEEEally big garage.
    The clocking formula is right on target.

    [Edited by gje1 on 01-31-2005 at 11:51 PM]

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    148
    sorry guys I might have a few things wrong with this equation. First it's a 60,000BTU unit heater. Next, it is a 2 lb. gas meter w/ a maxitrol inside the house stepping it down to 8"wc. Hope this clears thing up.
    Thanks for the help.

    helgy
    Helgy

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,458
    OK now make that last multilier 1.13 instead of 1.07

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Central Kansas
    Posts
    1,145
    Careful, Mike: remember, gas guys supposedly can't even tie their shoes without supervision and you're talking algebraic formulas now (lol)! One also would have to factor in run time, determined by heating degree day, heat loss of the structure, etc. to get all the data I think they are after. That's like asking how many gallons of gas my car will use on an any given day. You tell me how many miles I'm going to be driving, then I can determine fuel usage. Greg

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,458
    Point well taken. However my part stopped at btuh rate. Now he can sit there with a stop watch and time the burner on cycles.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Gilroy, Calif
    Posts
    188
    Now for the rest of the story. The original question was the cost for a 24 hour period for this heater. So, once you have the input per hour from your clocking. You'll need a current bill from your local utility company to find out the cost of a therm. Should be on the bill as therms used at unit cost of....... You can use this to calculate at 24 hour period. An easier way is. 100,000 btu = 1 therm and if one therm is equal to let say $1.41. Well you get the idea.

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