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  1. #1

    Hmm Installation Issues

    Making a long story short, I need to replace entire HVAC system. Is it my responsibility to ensure adequate access exists to remove/install new unit? Unit is in a crawlspace, and salesman went under the house, measured entryway, and determined, although tight, space is adequate. Contract already signed and payment made. They are now telling me I have to dig up a portion of my patio before they can proceed. Contract states ALL labor, and does not have any exceptions.
    How liable am I for the added work, and is this normal.. I would have understanded had this been brought to light during the sales call.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    983
    It is your house, so I would be inclined to say that it is your responsibilty. With that said, the salesman evidentally measured wrong, which could kind of make it his responsiblilty. I would get together with the installing company and see what kind of compromises could be reached. Is it possible to get the furnace down in the crawl if it is disassembled? It's a pain in the butt to disasseble them, but sometimes that's the only option. The salesman should have done more careful planning. I think it's a 50/50 deal. I would just go over the options with the installers to find out what needs to be done to get it in the hole. It may require you spending more money, but it is your home.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    325
    If digging up the patio is not listed on the contract , then? Why would they have to dig up the patio? Sometimes contracts change if there are things that are unforeseen. I imagine you would be able to stop the work and have them refund your money if no work had been performed? Sometimes sales people miss items that later are seen by the installers. Then they can change the contract. I don't think they usually do if it is a small thing. But if it is a labor intensive thing that is not listed on the contract but needs to be addressed to move ahead with the work then it should fall back on the homeowner to have to pay for the extra work. And the contract revised with the extra work added. I am not an attorney, just offering an opinion.
    Where is the manual? What does it say?

  4. #4
    Thanks... Installers said they were not responsible for any excavation, and i can except that. I have the salesman coming over shortly to discuss situation, but I would have not had an issue had it been identified up front, and is now a problem.
    Appreciate the response...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Albuquerque NM
    Posts
    2,485
    Since they didn't tell you about the excavation in advance of signing, and they haven't started work, they should refund the payment. Unless, of course, you can reach some sort of agreement acceptable to both parties.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    georgia
    Posts
    562
    skip the salesman and discuss this with the owner of the company.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    983
    Quote Originally Posted by b26440510 View Post
    skip the salesman and discuss this with the owner of the company.
    Should give the salesman the opportunity to make it right with the customer. Chances are, the salesman has already consulted with the owner over the issue anyway. There is no sense in getting all worked up over something that can probably be taken care by good communication between the ho and the salesman/installlers.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Dallas & Longview, TX
    Posts
    629
    Any time u have a situation like yours there is the possibility of unforseen obsticles occurring. The best advice I have is to start bidding out the patio demo and re-pour. Of course I'm assuming this is after you have exhausted all possibilities of finding a unit that would fit the existing space. This is a great chance for you to evaluate the customer service aspect of the company you choose to install ur unit.

  9. #9
    Thanks for all replies... After some pretty spirited conversations, I have an install scheduled for Monday. It was noted that the salesman did indeed make a bit of a mistake, (even after 3 visits, several measurements, and equipment changes). Bottom line is company is making it right, to include upgraded equipment at their cost.
    Required "excavation" was minimal to provide external equipment access, but under the house, there is a main sewer line that impedes unit swap-out. This was not taken into consideration (again, even after both salesman and contractor surveyed installation location) when making equipment choices.
    We're hoping for the best on monday!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    SouthEast NC ICW & Piedmont Foothills
    Posts
    7,635
    good for them

    good for you

    a signed contract is a legal document, the contractor should make it right

    it's not your ( as the customer) to correct a mistake made by salesperson
    It`s better to be silent and thought the fool; than speak and remove all doubt.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Pamnyra VA.
    Posts
    710
    Typical lousy salesman doesn't know what he is looking at. Years ago I looked at a attic install. I quoted the job and was a thousand dollars more then my competitor. I lost the job. The homeowner calls me in a panic,asking how was I planning to install the air handler? I told him to put the installer on the phone. He did and told him to break down the air handler 100 %. Remove blower, coil ... Then re-assemble in attic. I told the homeowner the extra money was the extra labor to breakdown and re-assemble. I won the homeowner over and the installer came looking for a job.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by dandyme View Post
    good for them

    good for you

    a signed contract is a legal document, the contractor should make it right

    it's not your ( as the customer) to correct a mistake made by salesperson
    If it's an honest mistake and discovered prior to the start of the job, then no, the contractor doesn't have to do extra work for free. If the customer can't accept that it will cost more, then the customer and contractor part ways: no harm, no foul.

    That's how I see it.

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