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  1. #1
    I want to know your views on WHO is really the responsible party when somethig goes wrong as well as whenever something turns out right?


    When Jack dont have the tools to do the repairs he is sent on .... who's to blame?

    When Cover-Girl dont have the software to do her dispatching duties most effeciently ... who's fault is that?

    When George goes out to do an install and the wrong furnace is delivered .... who is to blame there?

    When two employees on the crew fail to get along ... who's fault is it?


    When there's not enough hours to go around and a couple guys are getting behind in their martgages ... and begin to drop their production levels .... who is to blame?


    When a girl goes out to do a service call and she doesnt have the right tools to diagnose the heat exchanger .... who is to blame?


    When the service truck drops an axel, without warning, and the service tech, Susie, is stranded for hours awaiting someone to decide what to do about this .... who is to blame?






    Now .... repalce the phrase; "who is to blame, or who's fault is it?" with ... "Whose responsibility is this?"


    Company size does not matter.
    Pay or job classification of employee does not matter.
    Employment length does not matter either. Nor does how much the worker is paid.

    What are your views?

    I posted this here so you could let your hair down.


    Now y'all better post up here ... cause I want some opinions here.
    Don't make me use my stick!!!


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    forney texas
    Posts
    17,827
    Well, nobody is really to blame, cause **** happens, but it is everyones responsibility to deal with it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    SC
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    20,677
    Whoooa! AC bingo'ed!
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    For those who have fought for it, freedom has a sweetness the protected will never know.

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    S.W. PA
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    3,298

    When Jack dont have the tools to do the repairs he is sent on .... who's to blame?

    i would say jacks responibility even if tools are provided by company jack should be accountable for what is or is not in his truck provided that the tools in question are tools that are to be kept at shop and jack wasnot informed about the call.


    When Cover-Girl dont have the software to do her dispatching duties most effeciently ... who's fault is that?


    tricky one has cover girl told management that the software needed updated and found a realistic soultion to the problem if so managenent has next step if not cover girl should pick up the pace


    When George goes out to do an install and the wrong furnace is delivered .... who is to blame there?

    who delivered furnace? and who ordered it?



    When two employees on the crew fail to get along ... who's fault is it?
    this is fault not responsibility because if they can not ACT professional they should not be employees

    When there's not enough hours to go around and a couple guys are getting behind in their martgages ... and begin to drop their production levels .... who is to blame?

    production levels should be set to a standard if there is not enough work everyone suffers and everyone could pitch in to get more work


    When a girl goes out to do a service call and she doesnt have the right tools to diagnose the heat exchanger .... who is to blame?

    again is she required to have these tools and is it in writing? does the co supply and she forgot them?

    When the service truck drops an axel, without warning, and the service tech, Susie, is stranded for hours awaiting someone to decide what to do about this .... who is to blame?


    tell her relax she is getting paid to sit around!!




  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,333
    well said

  6. #6
    ENGHHHHHHHHH..... WRONG!!!

    It dont work!

    Your methods dont cut the mustard! They fail to keep people and projects on track!


    What is the use of having a manager unless they can do something to keep people on task and productive?

    If all they're gonna do is pass the buck .... then they are no different than a guy who was hired yesterday ... right off the street!


    A manager has to know the big picture and have means to employ his people in such ways they can do what needs to be done. And when things dont get done ... he accepts the blame.


    Want to step up and try your hand again?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    9,564
    Who's to blame when this should have been posted in a different forum?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Belton, Texas
    Posts
    107
    ENGHHHHHHHHH..... WRONG!!! <--- you just broke one of the most important rules in leadership. Do not talk down to anyone you are trying to lead.

    There is a reason that great leaders come along so rarely. Sure, there are many many good leaders today. There are many more adequate leaders. And all of them are outnumbered by poor leaders.

    The answer is pretty basic to your question R12. Responsibility for all outcomes lie with every person who had authority over that outcome. It's a tier system. Typically, at some point the wages and job descriptions eliminate accountability for those on the lower levels of the tier.

    The owner must take responsibility for all outcomes of the business. This is more than just the financial burden, though he carries that added responsibility. If the owner did not directly make the decision, he decided who would. Therefore he is culpable for the outcome. He either failed to manage by hiring the wrong person, setting the wrong standards, not giving enough training, not giving a reasonable budget to accomplish the task, or otherwise did not "get the job done" and it yielded undesirable outcomes. Owning is a very serious management responsibility and in our trade tends to be done by a veteran seasoned tech, probably very very good at technical issues and profited greatly as a tech. He uses his profits to start a business and may or may not be up to the task of being a people manager. Management is about people skills, not freon.

    Most companies employ some form of mid level management. Let us use the service manager for the example. He wields great decisionmaking authority within a company. He advices upper management on both technical and personnel issues. He helps establish the budget to accomplish company goals within the field area. His job description could be loosely translated into "accomplish all field goals of the firm". He also carries a great responsibility and should be compensated well if he does a good job. What does doing a good job mean? Well, getting the job done. The people doing the work report to him. They get training by him. He issues goals and tasks, and should supervise the performance of those goals and tasks. He is responsible for a subset of what the owner is responsible for. Just as the owner was not relieved of responsibility for field outcomes, nor should the service manager. If Billy wires the unit wrong and it burns the house down, the service manager AND the owner are responsible. If you investigated this outcome the way a commercial plane crash is investigated, you would probably find numerous errors on behalf of both these men that led to the fire. Most of those errors would be oversight errors. Owners should NEVER allow a service manager to blame anyone for mistakes. You take the responsibility. So should they.

    A manager has a duty to every employee to give them a fair chance at succeeding in their job. You will find the labor laws support that idea. It is the basis of equal employment and is how unfair termination suits are settled. What this means is that every employee must be given a clear goal and then the training and opportunity to accomplish that goal.

    Where do most service managers come from? Same place most owners do. They are intelligent experienced techs who show some initiative to be promoted. This makes them GREAT at technical issues. It doesn't mean they are necessarily good at managing men. They could be, but maybe not. If they are not, you will find high turnover rates among workers, low job satisfaction, and frequent callbacks to job sites. Reason; workers do not respect or like the man they are working for and perform poorly and inefficiently. It would be far superior in that instance to fire the tech and hire a pure manager to run the shop. Pay your best tech a little extra to play the role of technical advisor, but dont make him a manager. Good employees tend to be promoted to the level where they are no longer good at what they do, then cease being promoted. This insures ineffective people in most higher positions in a firm. Why do you think large corporations don't mind laying off 15% of a workforce every 5 years? To cut out the guys who aren't making it. Simple.

    The moral of the story is that managing is just that; managing. Your people skills will dictate whether you are a successful manager, not your technical expertise. If you see the value and productivity of your high school aged shop sweeper as important to the firm, you probably are a good manager. If he is your toy to vent frustrations on, you probably aren't.

    To all the managers out there, you carry a heavy load. And for all your troubles, what do you get? The men talk bad about you behind your back. Yes, you. Even you. When your intellect and wisdom combine with favorable market forces to create great profits, your men want a raise. You have a very thankless job. Just try to remember, it's business. Your job is to accomplish goals.

    So R12, your answer is; **** does not roll downhill as poor managers would say it does. It indeed does roll uphill, right through all levels of managers to the owner. They can deal with that reality in any way they choose, but if they face up to that, things tend to run a lot smoother.

    Tex

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,285

    Nicely stated, Tex.

    I hope you're running a company. It would be a great place to work, discipline is actually more fun than the other choice, where stuff doesn't get done always, stuff gets put away broken, backbiters and liars and cheats don't get moved on in life, and this stuff attracts more of this stuff.

    Give me a sharp, disciplined shop any day. Less hassle, better equipment, more jing left for pay raises, more camraderie among the crew, less mistakes on the job, more jobs completed on time, less loss of materials, more successful bids, and on, and on, and on.

    Good people attract good people. Weak people repell good people. Plain and simple.

    Noel

  10. #10

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Grand Cayman Island
    Posts
    134

    Cool

    The question is if these are these reoccuring item or do they only happen occasionally. Even a a company that is manage properly wil have these problems occasionally, but will learn from their mistakes. If they don't it is the responsibility of the management and eventually the owner.

    As far as the correct dispatching system this is a re-occuding item and the owner must bear the burden of the falult, if the decision is based on cost. I've seen several companies where the personal did not have the ability or the desire to fully use the existing system. That is the fault of the employee and the manager of that division for allowing it to occur, be it the owner or service manager.

    The tool issue is one that belongs to the service manager and the Tech. Both of them know the tools required to do a job and should not to take or dispatch a job when the tools on the truck are inaduquate.

    As far as finances the Tech is responsibily for managing his money. I've had Techs request extra work and if possible they have received the work, but I do not run a baby sitting service. The thing that realy upset me if the Tech does not use the resooures that are available to him. The worst thing is managing his pay check properly. I've had men lose their drivers license because of not paying child support etc. You know that the court is going to come after you and not receiving a bill does not excuse you from not paying.

    I agree with Texan30 and Noel that a disciplined shop is the best to work in. Everyone know his job and what is expected. I've always felt that a policy manual is a necessity for running a service department and the pollicies must be inforced. This also gives a good manager the option of occasionally bending the rules if it is required.
    [FONT="Comic Sans MS"]merken1[/FONT]

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    5

    ACTAULLY QUITE SIMPLE

    Management is ALWAYS to blame - end of story.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    23
    If I'm management, how am I to blame for Johnny going on his drinking binge the night before rolling into work hour late and burning himself as he sweat solders a line in?

    If I'm management, how am I to blame for a shipping error that put our project behind 2 days?

    If I'm management, how am I to blame for a traffic accident involving one of my fleet and another vehicle (no matter whose fault it was legally)?

    Blanket statements against management are like blanket statements against any group. They rarely work.

    In the above examples, I would not have sent Johnny out and would have sent his butt home without pay.

    I would have called the project manager and contractor and informed him of the delay and remedied the situation as best as could be managed.

    I would have no blame in a traffic accident but it's how it's managed that's important.

    In everything, whether it's service work or management or even washing your vehicle, there is tactics.

    It's how one understands tactics and the system in place to manage that true managers are seen.

    Blaming management for everything is just plain juvenile and non-professional in the most extreme sense of those definitions.

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