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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    va.
    Posts
    43

    Hmm

    Today at work I run into something that has got me stumped.Working on a traulsen refrigerator and found out it has a dead short but the unit been working fine.Metered everything out and everything checks out ok but it is showing dead short yet.Has anyone here had any trouble with INTELA control box? That is the only source I can think of but the only way I see to check it out is to replace it or does anyone have any idea?Thanks for your time.
    never too old to learn new tricks!

  2. #2
    J, first off ...let's keep this project low key here. Ok?

    Just keep it simple. "The Dice Method".

    It's 115 volts?

    If so, then it's got a cord to plug into the wall.
    It's got a junction box where it comes back from the wall, bring in power to the system.

    It will have a main system shut-off like a togle switch.

    The evaporator will have fans running all the time.

    There will be door switches controling the inside light.

    It will have a thermostat. This feeds power to the condensing unit.
    The condensing unit will have these components:
    compressor
    start relay
    start capacitor
    condensor fan motor


    There may be an electric condensate heater pan either up on top with the condensing unit or down the backside, mounted to the back wall. With the drain line going into it. Sometimes these go bad.



    The thing to do here is to isolate your loads.

    Each thing which draws electricity and current is a load.

    First thing I do when I find a dead short is isolate the compressor.

    I go right for the juggler, so to speak. Cause if the unit is shorted, it's a major deal. And you want to get aproval issued ASAP so yo can start pulling stuff apart.

    I remove the leads onto the compressor terminals. I go each terminal to copper tubing ground. If I read ANYTHING.... it's over ... she's history, it's DOA!!!

    But there can be NOTHING touching any compressor terminal when you do this test.

    Then I repeat this process to each and every load device until I isolate the short.


    Where I have found shorts in the past have been Wal-Mart, JC Penny's, The Gap ... oh wait a minute ... I'm on the wrong shorts here .... ooooooops .... I find most shorts in either the unit itself or in a wire which received a cut in it's insulation. Maybe vibration or getting jerked during service.


    The last time I had a short was in a brand spankin new pizza table. It had been delivered and never worked from day one.

    I removed every circuit and then one by one, tied them all back together again.
    And then it worked. It turned out to be a fluke of a problem done at the factory. They reversed a neutral somewhere.

    It was one of those things you couldnt duplicate unless yo knew just which wire you reversed.


    keep it simple.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    458
    Hve they cleaned the condensor lately(possibly with lots of liquid)? Inside the junction box is a grommet with the light wires running down into the box. Whether there is a light or not any liqid down the tube = short. Just a thought. Had one like this that stymied me for a bit till I isolated the loads like R12 suggested.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    34
    The Intelatraul is a work of art. Matter of fact I have one right now that I condemned. About $500.00 for that piece of ****. The Intelatraul is the brain. It works as the stat, the evap. fan power supplier, the condensor power supplier, as well as the defrost timer. The one I condemned is on a freezer. If it goes the system is dead.

  5. #5
    Originally posted by wunderman
    The Intelatraul is a work of art. Matter of fact I have one right now that I condemned. About $500.00 for that piece of ****. The Intelatraul is the brain. It works as the stat, the evap. fan power supplier, the condensor power supplier, as well as the defrost timer. The one I condemned is on a freezer. If it goes the system is dead.

    Somebody had a beta of one of those controls. I wired it on a W-I freezer I had. It was a pain.

    You would have to draw your own diagram and start from off the shelf stuff in order to bring one of those systems back online.

    Hope the customer has DEEEEEP Pockets!

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