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Thread: Sodadude

  1. #1
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    Ive got an old fountain machine, refer with a carbonator 6 selections for soda and 1 for cold water Its got to be 15 yrs old but works great , is it worth anything?.

  2. #2
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    Talking sodadude

    ct2 this is sodadudes mentor,its worth about 100.00 if that.but if it works good set it up in the garage,that would be cool in the summer when,the neighbors see you pouring fresh coca cola out of that puppy.
    if at first you dont succeed,then skydiving is not for you

  3. #3

    Re: sodadude

    Originally posted by len
    ct2 this is sodadudes mentor,its worth about 100.00 if that.but if it works good set it up in the garage,that would be cool in the summer when,the neighbors see you pouring fresh coca cola out of that puppy.
    That sounded like the right answer.

    Next question:

    Under what conditions should there ever be moisture in the CO2 lines that drive the flojet syrup pumps?

    Fred

  4. #4
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    There shouldnt be any moisture in the Co2 lines



    len I used to have it connected in the grage and you are right It was a hit.


    undertaker : back to your question: the last time I had this connected , if I recall correctly

    10 off of the Co2 bottle I had a regulator/ pressure gage(i dont remember the pressure it was set to)

    2) off of the regulator we made a manifold with high pressure hose and ran a pressure line to each selections ss tank and out of the ss tank with another hose to the mixer
    of each selection

    3) A water line from the faucet into a filter . 1 selection was used as a cold water (ice cold) water

    ok , heres where i am stuck: the carbonator,
    I remember something about the carbonator producing co2 and the gas adheared to the water at or below or around 40 degrees.......so it must take place or mix in the carbonator.

    now thats just a guess at this point, but you can bet I will find the correct answer soon. (by finding it in the book)

  5. #5
    Originally posted by ct2
    There shouldnt be any moisture in the Co2 lines



    len I used to have it connected in the grage and you are right It was a hit.


    undertaker : back to your question: the last time I had this connected , if I recall correctly

    10 off of the Co2 bottle I had a regulator/ pressure gage(i dont remember the pressure it was set to)

    2) off of the regulator we made a manifold with high pressure hose and ran a pressure line to each selections ss tank and out of the ss tank with another hose to the mixer
    of each selection



    So far that sounds like the system we had. We were buying most of our syrup from Coke. They upgraded us to Bag-in-box disposable containers which cannot be perssurized. Therefore, the syrup has to be pumped out of the bags with a gas (CO2 or dry air) powered pump.

    Coke restructured their distribution and delivery system, raised their prices by 25% and called it progress. We progressed to a small independent supplier (W.E. Salle). They seem to be more interested in little people.

    In years past, four or five, as long as we didn't use "diet" syrups, we've had no problems using the bag in box syrups stored at outdoor temperatures that can at times be close to 0F. However, during recent cold weather we have had ice in the gas side of the pumps and in the regulator which reduces the CO2 pressure from about 90PSI at the tank to about 35PSI to run the syrup pumps. I asked the weekend service guy from the syrup supplier, "How can there be moisture in the CO2 line?" He said, "It must be condensation in the hoses." I don't like to argue with people who are supposed to know more me, but condensation to me means that there has to be humid air getting into the cold hoses etc. That cannot happen if it is a sealed system. I've heard that water in the CO2 tank is very bad news but could it happen and if so how bad is the news?

    Fred

    [Edited by ice machine undertaker on 12-31-2004 at 09:16 PM]

  6. #6
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    condensation to me means that there has to be humid air getting into the cold hoses etc.


    or that the system wasnt purged prior to being sealed, and there was moisture trapped in the system .

    The syrup pumps are connected directly to a dry co2 bottle , however! if the volume of gas being used--is set to high , the lines will get cold enough for ice to form on the exterior surfaces,....

    Thanks for responding to this thread. I stopped at a used restraunt supply here in town and it didnt take long to realise that this machine really is to old for anything other than around the house....It works really well, but I quit drinking sugared sodas and somehow, it just isnt the same anymore.

    are there any websites around that have good info on repairing soda machines / fountains and ice machines?

  7. #7
    Originally posted by ct2

    Thanks for responding to this thread. I stopped at a used restraunt supply here in town and it didnt take long to realise that this machine really is to old for anything other than around the house....It works really well, but I quit drinking sugared sodas and somehow, it just isnt the same anymore.

    are there any websites around that have good info on repairing soda machines / fountains and ice machines?

    I don't know of any such sites but I haven't looked either.

    When I get decent used equipment, I sometimes make a donation of it to a local charitable organization. I use ebay for determining the fair market value.

    Fred

  8. #8
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    Sep 2004
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    http://www.boneville.net/soda/examples.htm

    On this page there is a pic of a machine that has a few liquor bottles on the top

    This is not my machine but mine is the same ( with no bottles)

  9. #9
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    May 2003
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    1,065

    Ct2

    I've been hiding out in the Twilight Zone and just now found your post. I will read the whole thing carefully a little later. I just wanted to let you know you can get moisture or water in the lines to your syrup pumps if you have a bad check valve on the carbonator. That would actually allow sodawater to travel backwards into your CO2 system. I had one once that when I was taking the CO2 nut off the tank, it started spraying water all over the place out the gas hose!!!!!

    Listen to Len, he knows his stuff. And has a really cool brother in law, heh, heh.

    Ooops! I guess I should have addressed this to the undertaker. Whoever you talked to should have known about a failed check valve on the carbonator. Actually it is a double check valve on the CO2 tank into the carbonator and as a rule we are also supposed to install a backflow preventor to keep the plain water from getting mixed in with the sodawater.

    You see, you can get very ill if CO2 water gets into your copper water pipes and causes a chemical reaction and a iron kind of taste.

    If you ever get water in your co2 system, discontinue use of the equipment until you have cleaned or replaced the double check valve. Sodadude.

    [Edited by sodadude on 01-02-2005 at 03:37 PM]
    I pray not for an easy life but that I be a strong person.

  10. #10
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    Sep 2004
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    Sodadude:
    how does a carbonater actually work ? I am trying to picture this . You have a fresh water line- and a co2 line feeding the carbonator pump and a carbonated water line on the discharge side , but is the carbonator compressing the gas water mixture? and arent those brass pumps? I understand that carbonated water reacts with copper and produces a toxic by product but what about brass ?

    you may have missed this but I have had the machine for years , but I finally took the steps I needed to go to school and I would like to learn all I can about this busniess . I think I would like to go into this end of the bus

  11. #11

    Lightbulb how they work

    ct2

    The way mine is hooked up is: There is a fresh water line (preferably filtered) to the pump. There is a CO2 line to the carbonator tank. This line should be pressure regulated to about ten psi greater than the fresh water line pressure.

    Inside the tank there is a liquid level sensor. On initial startup the carbonator tank is filled with CO2 and since the level sensor senses an "empty tank" the pump motor starts and tries to fill the tank with water. The pump will run until the sensor detects liquid. At that point in time the tank contains pressurized CO2 and water. Under that much pressure there is a chemical reaction between the two. H20 + CO2 + pressure = H2CO3 which is chemically known as carbonic acid or more common folks call it soda water. There is a tube inside the tank reaching nearly to the bottom attached to a stainless, tin or FDA approved plastic tube at the top through which the soda water travels to cold plate under an ice bin (remember that compressing a gas-CO2-generates heat) to chill it. The soda water must never come in contact with copper, brass, or iron. After the cold plate the soda water is tubed to the dispenser head(s) where it is mixed with the flavor of your choice. As the soda water flows out of the tank more CO2 is added thereby maintaining pressure until the level in the tank activates the level sensor and starts the pump motor.....etc, etc.


    Fred

  12. #12
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    Sep 2004
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    Thank you Fred. Its been awile since ive had it connected but I think now that I have a better understanding , in going to bring it to school so we can all learn from it

    thanks again

  13. #13

    Thumbs up school

    ct2

    The good Lord gave most of us two eyes, two ears and one mouth. Usually we learn best if we use them proportionately.

    Fred

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