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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    876

    Response to RichardL

    I kind of think he lost his job, Now he is walking down I-10 carrying a sign "will install absorbers for food" -GEO
    Once in a while everything falls into place and I am able to move forward, most of the time it just falls all over the place and I can't go anywhere-GEO

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    224
    oouch!! that bang would have hurt ones pride.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Dixiana, AL
    Posts
    2,611
    Quote Originally Posted by RichardL View Post
    This one reminds me of the great start-up at the SuperDome in New Orleans...
    3 huge 1800 ton York absorbers had the generators blown out of them in a single day when a 600psi steam supply reduced to 30 psi with the de-superheater condensate valves were closed..De-superheater pumps were running & auto valves were functioning but alas,,,,the isolation condensate valves were closed....Cost to replace the upper vessels was over 2-1/2 million$$$ since the building was literally built around these huge puppies,,,
    I wonder where that York start-up man is today....
    He probably went to work for jci shortly thereafter......

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    U.A. (upper Alabama)
    Posts
    867
    Quote Originally Posted by bertoh View Post
    Is that 10 psi being measured near the 1" regulator or back on the 2.5" ?? I would get it away from that hi velocity area and make sure there is a pigtail on the gauge. Just a thought.
    Ga1279 is right, it is not getting superheated without a heat source, or everybody would want one of those regulators.
    Temp is easily enough measured, pressure is a bit tougher on steam. The bit of steam fitting I did , I know that the small things are the ones that kill ya. Pitch that pipe towards the trap, eccentric pipe reducers only etc.
    Double check the pressure. Hope that helps
    It's on the 2.5" pipe down stream of the reg.. It already had pigtail and new gauge but we replaced both of them. The other chiller that I thought steam temp. was normal on (because I checked temp. when reg. was backed off) turned out to be the same temp. when machine was on and control valve at 100%, with more steam going through regulator. Waiting on an engineer, but I think we are going to install another reg. outside on 200 PSI steam and drop it to 50 or so to maybe get rid of some of the superheat instead of having 380 deg steam 15 feet from the chiller. Oh yeah, chiller is designed for 320 deg max inlet steam and up to 75 PSI. Also it's not getting superheated, It's just not having enough time to get rid of the superheat because regs. are so close. I think?

  5. #18
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Western Wa
    Posts
    1,842
    Do you have drip legs and drip leg traps in front of the control valves?

    Just wondering.
    God Bless our Veterans

    God Bless the USA

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    U.A. (upper Alabama)
    Posts
    867
    Quote Originally Posted by Randy S. View Post
    Do you have drip legs and drip leg traps in front of the control valves?

    Just wondering.
    Yes and yes.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    7,326
    hey, ga, you ight want to become a tad more educated about steam before posting wrong information. THE ORIGINAL steam supply is 200 psig, which at saturation is 387 degrees according to your post. when pressure gets reduced, it doesnt automatically drop temp on the saturation scale, so you then have SUPERHEATED, lower pressure steam. this is a common mistake made in steam troubleshooting. the 280 is real, and can wander, depending on orifice size, transmission of btus to the surrounding air, etc. lower velocities will make for higher surface temps, as he has seen. In addition, the size of the regulator is irelevant, as they are sized by cv, or pounds per hour. i do agree that larger regs with lower velocities are better, but not always done that way by the choo choo men.

    this reminds me of the dupont site that used city steam, coming in at 290 psig, and installed new commercial steam rad valves every year, because they kept failing. my service guy asked me to meet the dupont choo choo men to explain superheat. they told me i was nuts, that ten psi was well below the rated pressure of fifteen, and showed me the steam tables indicating temp was fine as well. valves were honeywell and rated at 249 degrees f, but since it was being reduced from 290 psi to ten, the temp was around three hundy on the pipe, outside, in the winter. they told us our instruments were bad, got theirs, and saw the same.......final answer was, and i quote "i must have missed that steam class in college, sell us the right valves".

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    U.A. (upper Alabama)
    Posts
    867
    Quote Originally Posted by flange View Post
    hey, ga, you ight want to become a tad more educated about steam before posting wrong information. THE ORIGINAL steam supply is 200 psig, which at saturation is 387 degrees according to your post. when pressure gets reduced, it doesnt automatically drop temp on the saturation scale, so you then have SUPERHEATED, lower pressure steam. this is a common mistake made in steam troubleshooting. the 280 is real, and can wander, depending on orifice size, transmission of btus to the surrounding air, etc. lower velocities will make for higher surface temps, as he has seen. In addition, the size of the regulator is irelevant, as they are sized by cv, or pounds per hour. i do agree that larger regs with lower velocities are better, but not always done that way by the choo choo men.

    this reminds me of the dupont site that used city steam, coming in at 290 psig, and installed new commercial steam rad valves every year, because they kept failing. my service guy asked me to meet the dupont choo choo men to explain superheat. they told me i was nuts, that ten psi was well below the rated pressure of fifteen, and showed me the steam tables indicating temp was fine as well. valves were honeywell and rated at 249 degrees f, but since it was being reduced from 290 psi to ten, the temp was around three hundy on the pipe, outside, in the winter. they told us our instruments were bad, got theirs, and saw the same.......final answer was, and i quote "i must have missed that steam class in college, sell us the right valves".
    Thanks, flange. I'm glad to see someone else has seen this. I know there is some absorber techs that have run into this before also.

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