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Thread: Tools

  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Maryland's Eastern Shore
    Posts
    892
    I like Klein for a majority of my hand tools... I fill out my tool bag with Channellock and Craftsman... I prefer Fieldpiece, because it feels as if the meter was made for HVAC guys, BY HVAC guys... Defiantly Yellow Jacket for refrigerant stuff... I like Milwaukee for power tools and Ridgid for plumbing tools... I try to stay as far away from Stanley as I can and that goes for Dewalt too.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    1,815
    My opinion/experience on one of my favorite subjects:

    Pliers:
    Klien- tried and true choose carefully because they will be around for a while.
    Baco- A Snap-on subsidiary they are great tools comparable or superior to Klien (I know some of you think it’s blasphemy).
    Knipex- their diagonal cutters are amazing. The channel lock type pliers are an improvement over the original.
    Grip-on has a good vice grip style plier you can clamp to a table and use as a mini vice

    Ratchets:
    Snap-on- the best available and they price them accordingly. You and bet your life on them.
    ProTo (Stanley and Husky) my next choice Husky would be my recommendation for value priced tools when you are first starting out (Home Depot).

    Screw/nut drivers:
    Snap-on- screwdrivers are pretty good they fit the hand nicely
    Klien- makes some great cushioned screwdriver/nut drivers these are a very good bet.
    Rigid- makes decent screwdrivers as well.

    Wrenches:
    Snap-on- Simply the best combination wrenches ever no one even comes close. Their box end offsets are great. The ratcheting boxed end wrenches (dog bones) are worth every penny there is no comparison!
    ProTo- pretty good
    S&K- My second choice after snap-on
    Husky- The polished husky wrenches are a close imitation to snap-on a very sound choice for a beginner.

    Hammers:
    Eastwing- The snap-on of hammers
    Malco-sound hammers and duct tools

    Drills:
    Cordless:
    DeWalt- widely available and rugged higher end of the price range.
    Milwaukee-very rugged replacement parts easily obtainable
    Bosh- pricy but performs well
    Rigid- soon to be a competitor with the big boys I would not feel unarmed with one
    Makita- a little less robust than the others but it makes up for it in longevity.
    Ryobi- great for a beginner very economical and the quality is pretty decent

    Corded:
    Milwaukee- The only corded drill for many I agree. Tough as a tank.
    The others mentioned above same thing here!

    Blades:
    Lennox- tried and true

    Meters:
    Fluke- the best all I’ve used

    Gages:
    Hard to say you will end up with more than one pair if you work on bigger equipment. I was told buy a pair that you won’t cry over when they fall off the roof. You can repair them most wholesalers have parts.
    Refco- makes some robust gages catering to the refrigeration side of the house and they have a vacuum pump that looks like a tank. Their refrigeration tools are nice.

    Tubing/piping
    Rigid- the best tubing cutters reamers all piping tools don’t care for their flare set it does not swage.
    Refco- Flare kit flares and swages


    NOTE:

    I was told along time ago a power tool quality is related to the length of its cord. I find this to be true in almost every case (longer = better).

    When you select a cordless drill consider an impact driver. They out perform a regular drill when shooting screws and eliminate wrist whipping

    Good drill bits (Lawson products) are expensive so get a Drill Dr. or buy cheap ones with disposable intentions.

    Hope that’s enough to chew on.
    Quote
    “Engineers like to solve problems. If there are no problems handily available, they will create their own." Scott Adams

    "We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."
    Albert Einstein

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    9,937
    Originally posted by air of honesty
    For adjustable wrenches, check out the Diamond brand at your favorite supply houses. I really don't know if its still out there, haven't needed to replace it. Opens wider than comparable sized wrenches, handles the suction line disconnects and such.
    I think Diamond's still out there and make some great tools. The best set of snips I've ever owned were made by them.

    As R12 said, Channel Locks are junk. They used to make good tools years ago.

    I like Klein a lot too.

    I've never lost a Harbor Freight tool. I can throw those knuckle busters away and they'll jump back in my tool box. I use em to beat on things with, but sometimes they break and the pieces hit me in the head.



  4. #17
    i have recently started using alot of irwin tools. i have a set of their pipe wrenches, their aviation snips, left and right, their "m5's", and a really nice tool bag from them. i also use alot of malco in my sheet metal bag.

    for hand tools, basically what everyone else said, but i do have ONE tool i cant go without in my service bag...its a "t-handle" screwdriver made by husky, looks like a 6in1, but the driver comes out, and snaps into the handle, giving you a stubby t handled driver, great for circuit board screws on blower motor housings.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,157
    almost everything is ok ...just stay out of harborfreight!!



    If it was'nt for Harbour Freight we wouldnt have any tools to work with at school. Everything they buy is from that place.

    When you show up on a job with cheap junk tools it sticks out like a sore thumb.

    It sure is more impressive to see someone showing up for work with The right tools , and good quality tools.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,157
    I've never lost a Harbor Freight tool. I can throw those knuckle busters away and they'll jump back in my tool box.

    Thats funny , Ive noticed the same thing but the best thing about HF tools is they never get stolen, You can leave them on a job , they will be there the next time you are back on the job, ,, even the worst of theifs wont steel their stuff

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    32

    Thumbs up tools

    dewalt power tools, rigid tubing cutters, klien cutters, sears metal snips left & right (the best)crafstman whenever possible!! fat boss 3o'tape measure

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    1,815
    Why use tools that are so bad no one will steal them?
    Quote
    “Engineers like to solve problems. If there are no problems handily available, they will create their own." Scott Adams

    "We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."
    Albert Einstein

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    91
    ones you do not mind to donate to home owner's attics , crawls and such.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    303
    Brought my Craftsman 1/2 ratchet wrench back to Sears for a replacement, as the ratchet mechanism jammed. They don't replace it with a new one, like they did yrs ago, but with a refurbished one. Clerk had a box full of tools under the counter, all with a refurbished sticker on them.

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