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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    High Point, NC
    Posts
    1

    Frown

    How do you calculate cfm from tonage for an air make-up init for a paint booth? I know my customer is looking at a 10 ton unit and I need to convert to cfm. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    new jersey
    Posts
    31
    well one ton is equal to 400cfm's.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Mid-west
    Posts
    567
    Not an easy calculation due to outdoor air and RH%, best to contact manufacture and get exact spec's from your customer so there will be no misunderstanding.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    1,389

    hpmccurrys

    Your customer is working backwards unless another contractor or person told him a 10-ton unit is what he needs.
    First, find out the exhaust air for the booth. Then figure the make up air to supply the booth given he would want to keep the room in a slight negative pressure. Then figure the tonnage required to cool and/or heat the make up air along with any internal/external loads to the conditions the customer wants. RH may be of importance depending on the paint he is using and required drying time. He will have to give you the final DB/RH and each respective control swing allowable for his processes.
    Good luck.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    100

    Thumbs up

    Just as twcpipes said...

    Best place to start is to get exact required conditions for the paint, meaning if it's used in any type of process there are different paints that require different temperatures and humidity especially if they are using any water based paints.

    Once you know the requirements of the paint then find out the supply air requirements, once you have the above info sizing the system is easy!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    21
    I just went through this on a 15 million dollar paint facility. The manufacturer, U.S. Filter sized the facility as follows:

    1. Airflow design is 100 ft/min velocity across the face of the unit being painted.

    2. Determine temperature and %RH requirements for the paint being used.

    Because our facility is in South Mississippi, 100% outside air handlers had to be used to pre-treat the outside air. The air was then recirculated through the facility and controlled by passing through temperature control units (in this case 100,000 cfm air handling units) and the system exhausted the same amount of outside air that it took in for balance. The air passes through Torrit dust collectors with paint baffles as they also blast steel in this building before they paint.

    Hope this helps a little.

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