Who Pays For tech training???
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  1. #1
    If a seasoned tech comes to you and you hire them on ... you are paying them top dollar. Correct?

    They received training elsewhere.
    They learned the ropes, elsewhere.
    They got thier act together, elsewhere.
    They made the simple mistakes elsewhere.

    And now that they have proven themselves worthy and have their own hand tools and knowledge ... you will be reaping the benefits of the training and instruction provided by "others" in the past.


    But when you decide to hire a green horn and raise them up from inside your company by training them yourselves ... who should bare the burden of classroom time and study time when the service tech/ student is not out in the field performing hands on work?

    I know you would pay them a wage of some sort, for OJT and ride a longs with a Mentor.
    But would you also pay them to sit in the classroom, in your own facilities, and receive instruction by your own staff trainer?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Port Hueneme, CA
    Posts
    34
    My opinon is that yes you will have to pay them, maybe not the full blown top of the pay chart tech pay. But remember something new is being manufactured everyday. Even your top of the line techs do not know it all! Car dealerships must keep their mechs trained or they will loose the right to service under that name.

    I would love to do ride alongs to learn more in this field, I would even ride for free (on my free time) but no one would do that because of the insurance.

    I also try to attend all the training avalable in my area (free training) (I dont have a lot of spare cash).

    So yes training should be paid for by the employer, and the employer should try to keep the techs they spent their time and money on, it is their money!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    2,927
    Originally posted by ch47mech
    I also try to attend all the training avalable in my area (free training) (I dont have a lot of spare cash).

    I dont have ANY spare cash.So if you dont mind me asking, where do you find free training?
    Thank you.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Charleston,SC
    Posts
    515
    I know that some manufactures offer free classes thru parts houses. Recently Carrier thru United Refrigeration gave a class on the Carlyle '06 Compresor, tear down and etc...a local RSES Chapter offer good classes from time to time. Again mentioning manufactures, based on your amount of sales they offer a technical education program. But then again a good lead tech can provide this education "in house" based around a weekly or monthly service meeting. Ran into a problem not too long ago with a company that had the attitude that as soon as they sent them to school, the tech's would leave, so they only offered schools to upper echelon positions. So what you had was office or "pick-up" truck bound folks who would benifit but would rarely have "hands-on" with the knowledge.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Port Hueneme, CA
    Posts
    34
    The gas and electrict company, I beleive it was RSES, and united refrig. These are the places where I can/have gotten free training

  6. #6
    Our company will pay for a day class during normal hours and will pay us for the time there. That's cool.

    They will pay for after hour training or alert us of free after hours training but not pay us (voluntary). That's cool.

    They also provide in-house training before/after hours and not pay us for it (voluntary). That's cool, too.

    Any training is a good thing in my eyes and I will jump on it.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    2,927
    Ok.Thanks again.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Sunny So Cal!
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    649
    I have done ride alongs learning and have hosted them- They can be huge in getting a leg up in the biz. I think you really can send a message to your company and more importantly to your peers by doing this that you are earnest in learning more- a little weekend help for one of your journeymen will likely guarantee he'll return your plea for help at that nightmare call. Market J-men are a grumpy lot (esp. where dispatch is concerned)
    RSES member for 10 yrs or so and you can get good info through their meetings- knowing who to ask is most of the battle. Contact your nearest Sporlan office and ask for literature- good rule with any manufacturer. I probably have 150 lbs of literature on my truck from everyone and use it often enough.
    I got off topic- yes I believe that a company should pay for training- offering this chance to improve yourself as a mechanic is a big draw for hires...

  9. #9
    Originally posted by thegoodhumorman
    I have done ride alongs learning and have hosted them- They can be huge in getting a leg up in the biz. yes I believe that a company should pay for training- offering this chance to improve yourself as a mechanic is a big draw for hires...

    Thanks




  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    933
    as a student who found out the hard way, any guy you are sending or want to send to school should start at the financial aid office, my first semester i scraped the cash together, then found out I was elegeable for money I do not have to repay(grants). Experience has taught me to at least explore the option, I am not sure how that falls into your situation, but it was definately a lesson for me, I do not want to be a sponge but I need the help, I will take it and better myself.
    Still learning opinions welcome.

  11. #11
    Where I work they are very generous, if a guy has the smarts and is the type who sticks with learning and the company the sky is the limit. Week long JC classes, Centrificals in Syracuse, VFD's in CT., all paid time and tuition etc. Co. paid up front. I give back too, I volunteer to lead in-house training, mentor newer guys, and take some of the resposability for running the crew, all with no addtl. compensation. I'm usually the go-to guy when someone is stuck, or can't figure out a night call. I have found a good spot for myself and hope to be here awhile.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Denali Park, Alaska, McMurdo Station, Antarctica
    Posts
    114

    training

    Went to school in Phoenix, and then followed the lead around for couple seasons, then he left and it was me. A few seasons on that gig, then I came down here. Went to a Copeland class, and one for the ULTs , and that is pretty much it. The rest is a stumble along as it goes and catch a supply house seminar nw and again. Not much available up in Alaska as far as RSES goes. This site is the rest of my schooling to date.
    Remember the lowest bid isn't always the best deal.

    To err is human, to really screw things up requires an electrical engineer.

    If brute force and ignorance isn't working for you, you probably aren't using enough.

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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    56
    r12 i think a better question to ask is who pays for a lack of tech training. bottom line is the more your techs know the more profitable they are to the customer a happy customer pays his bills a smart employer always helps his employees become more knowdglable about thier craft.

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