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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    3
    I've been doing residential for seven years now, and I'm becoming a little discouraged. I really would like to get into more commercial and/or with a bigger, well-known company. It seems though that either the big companies are hiring people fresh out of school and/or those with commercial experience (I have light commercial experience but have been told it's not enough). I would like to get into a union possibly, but so far have had no luck. Last summer's mild weather nearly wrecked my company, and I barely worked more than 10 hours a week. Like others, I cannot survive like that - I need a steady, full-time job.

    Does anyone have any suggestions as to how I may go about getting one? Why are they so hard to find? I have friends at a few other residential companies and they don't work steady hours either unfortunately. I'm learning that it's hard to support a family in this profession. Any advice would be appreciated.

    Oh, and I live near Chicago, Illinois.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,841
    wilkb I was told there was a lot of work in chicago & the pay was good.Union sucks but big commercial shouldn't be tough to find in chicago.If you find a job you won't bug the hell out of them you must be in the right place at the right time or know someone.good luck

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    125

    Try These:

    http://smw73.org/Apprentice.htm

    http://www.smw265.org/Training/training_home.htm

    http://www.pf597.org/


    Dont give up. It will be the best in the long run. Dont call. Go in person and keep trying

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    125
    Union sucks

    Not in the windy. Its a union town, especialy commercial construction

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    3
    Thanks for the links, I will certainly not give up!

    Do you guys have any ideas on how I might be able to work building maintenance, like hospitals, etc.? I never see them advertised, I wonder if they go through employment agencies???

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    17,818
    Dont get discouraged. You will find something. I hated doing commercial all the time. You have to set your ladder up 20 times a day and lug all your crap up and down. By the time your ready to work, you just want to lay down and I am no weakling. Gets old real quick especially when its 90 degrees out.
    "Politicians are the lowest form of life on Earth. Liberal Democrats are the lowest form of politician"

    - General George S. Patton

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    chicago suburbs
    Posts
    4,422
    Originally posted by wilkb
    Thanks for the links, I will certainly not give up!

    Do you guys have any ideas on how I might be able to work building maintenance, like hospitals, etc.? I never see them advertised, I wonder if they go through employment agencies???
    most building engineers are local 399.........
    FILL OUT YOUR PROFILE!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Bartlett, IL
    Posts
    6,619
    Originally posted by wilkb
    Thanks for the links, I will certainly not give up!

    Do you guys have any ideas on how I might be able to work building maintenance, like hospitals, etc.? I never see them advertised, I wonder if they go through employment agencies???
    Local 399 Stationary Engineers work the hospitals and all the Downtown city buildings. No easy task, you need a stationary engineers license to get that gig. But you can start out at the bottom and work your way up as an apprentice...pretty boring if you ask me.

  9. #9
    not enough steady work to be at a facility imo, but just keep at it, make some calls, tell them what you know, and in no time, people will be calling you asking when YOU can start.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    279
    the company i formerly worked for did mostly resitential work. i did most of the comercial work for them. i asked to be layed of so i could get mor comercial/industrial experiance. i was in your boat. i averaged 25 hours a week for 3 years.
    i made the jump. i worked the summer doing industrial work, but was layed off due to the work drying up. i was the low man so i let go. comercial industrial isnt much different unless you are talking centrif. and absorbers. the equipment works the same. it can be easy or hard. know my union is telling me probly no work till spring. thats a big shot in the arm for me and my family.
    i think the union is the way to go though. better pay and the bens.

  11. #11
    Attend the next RSES meeting in your immediate area. If it looks slack, check out other meetings/ chapters also.

    Contact chapter presidents and tell them your situation. Ask them for adivce.

    Go online to HVAC Agent. post a resume.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,579

    Write a professional resume and learn some interview skills. Learn how to sell yourself. Your local community college offers resume help, interviewing skill seminars and personal presentation help for those looking for a job change.

    A good HVAC technician should be able to go nearly anywhere and get a job. But, you must be able to present yourself well. That makes all the difference!


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