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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    74

    PREFABRICATED CONCRETE SLABS

    Here in Palm Beach County Florida, A/C contracters use the prefab concrete slabs in lieu of poured concrete. Most customers are not even aware of these slabs not being the "real deal" and being quite cheap and flimsy. I believe it's a combination of concrete and fiberglass and is fairly light (compared to solid concrete). I'm concerned that if the wind picked up enough in a very strong storm/hurricane, away goes the condenser and slab together. I have a 3 ton Trane XR15. Of course at that point, my roof might go the same route! Although hurricane straps are required in numerous Florida Counties, the slab itself is not very substantial. I know poured concrete is the way to go, but it will be a pain at this point to have it done. What do you guys think about the prefab? Does it do what it is intended to do to hold the condenser in place and structurally, should it last 10 years+?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Clearwater, Fl
    Posts
    358
    These are the pads that we use and are approved for use in Florida up to 150 MPH winds. If this is what was installed under your unit you should have no issues.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    If people only focused on the important things in life there would be a shortage of fishing poles.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    74
    Quote Originally Posted by forcryinoutloud View Post
    These are the pads that we use and are approved for use in Florida up to 150 MPH winds. If this is what was installed under your unit you should have no issues.
    The label on the pad reads as follows: FRCC Products, Inc. Solid Lightweight Concrete Pad. Conforms to the Florida Building Code Chapter 16, and Mechanical Section 304.7 American Concrete Institute Product Designation ACI
    115R-902

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Clearwater, Fl
    Posts
    358
    According to the labeling it has been engineered to meet Florida standards.
    If people only focused on the important things in life there would be a shortage of fishing poles.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    74
    Your pad looks significantly superior and has some weight to it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Clearwater, Fl
    Posts
    358
    I tried a Google search for FRCC to take a look at the pad that you have but came up with nothing. The only one I'm familiar with is the DiversiTech pad. According to the labeling the FRCC would pass inspection, but who knows how long it would last. DiversiTech offers a warranty that is equivalent to the life expectancy of the equipment that is set on top of it.
    If people only focused on the important things in life there would be a shortage of fishing poles.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Just outside Charleston, SC
    Posts
    32
    Had a customer's unit get blown over when a tornado came through. It was by no means a direct hit but the winds got up pretty high, wish I had a picture of it to show homeowners when I try to convince them to let me pour a propper slab with new construction.

    I don't need to tell you what it did to the compressor, the lines, and all the cold juice in the system.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Clearwater, Fl
    Posts
    358
    Quote Originally Posted by cpark View Post
    Had a customer's unit get blown over when a tornado came through. It was by no means a direct hit but the winds got up pretty high, wish I had a picture of it to show homeowners when I try to convince them to let me pour a propper slab with new construction.

    I don't need to tell you what it did to the compressor, the lines, and all the cold juice in the system.
    New construction gets poured slabs or well built stands depending on where flood level is, but I have not yet found a customer that will let us disconnect their a/c, pour a slab, the install the new one the next day.

    Nobody wants to be without air around here. We have some that think the replacement will only take 3 - 4 hours for a full system change out and complain when they're told 8 - 10 hours to do it right.
    If people only focused on the important things in life there would be a shortage of fishing poles.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    74
    Quote Originally Posted by forcryinoutloud View Post
    New construction gets poured slabs or well built stands depending on where flood level is, but I have not yet found a customer that will let us disconnect their a/c, pour a slab, the install the new one the next day.

    Nobody wants to be without air around here. We have some that think the replacement will only take 3 - 4 hours for a full system change out and complain when they're told 8 - 10 hours to do it right.
    My installer is willing to come by and move the condenser if I am having a contractor come by to pour the cement. I was thinking of pouring the cement over the existing 3X3 pad to make it 4X4 and add an additional 4" in height to help with drainage issues. I'm waiting to get a price and also decide if I want the headache of coordinating the installer and contractor as well as being without A/C for a day. Also, do you guys use quickset to minimize the time allowed to set up the condenser? Shouldn't the slab take time to cure before screwing in the anchors?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Just outside Charleston, SC
    Posts
    32
    Quote Originally Posted by forcryinoutloud View Post
    New construction gets poured slabs or well built stands depending on where flood level is, but I have not yet found a customer that will let us disconnect their a/c, pour a slab, the install the new one the next day.

    Nobody wants to be without air around here. We have some that think the replacement will only take 3 - 4 hours for a full system change out and complain when they're told 8 - 10 hours to do it right.
    Yea I usually try to schedule those for the fall or spring so I don't have to hear from the woman of the household how it is 74 inside and she can not live unless it is 76.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    74
    Quote Originally Posted by cpark View Post
    Yea I usually try to schedule those for the fall or spring so I don't have to hear from the woman of the household how it is 74 inside and she can not live unless it is 76.

    So it is ok to resecure the condensor (screwing in the anchors) after only 24hrs of curing? I have no problem waiting a few days if it would be a stronger pad.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Clearwater, Fl
    Posts
    358
    Quote Originally Posted by cpark View Post
    Yea I usually try to schedule those for the fall or spring so I don't have to hear from the woman of the household how it is 74 inside and she can not live unless it is 76.
    What is this Fall and Spring that you speak of?
    If people only focused on the important things in life there would be a shortage of fishing poles.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    930
    I've poured the slab, placed plywood on top (spray the face with oil), then set the unit immediately. Come back in a couple of days and remove the plywood and the rest of the concrete form.

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