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Thread: why,why, why?

  1. #1

    Angry

    Why do apprentice do not get any respect in the trade? For example, senior tech are always puting us down and don"t want to teach us. Don"t get me wrong the marjority techs are helpfull but,some few i cant understand.

    [Edited by green_apprentice on 11-14-2004 at 12:06 AM]

  2. #2
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    Ive found over the years that the techs that wont teach you are the ones that either dont know, are insecure that if they teach you they will lose there job, or are just plain ignorant. Its a shame because it is the only way this feild will improve from the downward sprial its taken over the last 20 yrs.
    Your poor planning does not constitute an emergency on my part!!!!

  3. #3
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    ab is right! Sometimes I think many journeymen suffer from low self esteem and giving the apprentices a hard time makes them feel better about themselves. Hang in there and learn what you can from them.

  4. #4
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    Originally posted by green_apprentice
    Why do apprentice do not get any respect in the trade? .

    Because you haven't earned it , ya rookie!

  5. #5
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    Originally posted by Collin
    Originally posted by green_apprentice
    Why do apprentice do not get any respect in the trade? .

    Because you haven't earned it , ya rookie!
    Or phrases like "why, why, why?" aren't confined to the message boards. I don't like sniveling apprentii, personally. I only like the ones who want to learn without crying.

    That being said, the sad fact of the matter is a large portion of the current generation of service techs are barely capable of performing their own work, let alone capable of teaching someone else to do theirs. The technician shortage is worse than a lot of us realized, as there are more warm bodies dressed up as techs than there are actual techs. 98.6 was the standard for hiring service techs for way too long. Formal education in the past few decades steadily degraded until it was barely available, and too many learned what (often little) they know from Hard Knocks U, and feel that that edumicayshun as all they'll ever need. Now we're, as an industry, suffering, and looking like fools.

    So, since the tide is turning, and education is improving, and new standards are popping up everywhere, from more alphabet soup clubs than there are alphabet soup govt agencies, technicians entering the field are better educated, but are unable to find people to show them how to apply their educations.

    Or, you could be a snot nosed whiner. I really don't know.

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by condenseddave

    Or, you could be a snot nosed whiner. I really don't know.
    It's why we love the internet.

  7. #7
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    Originally posted by Collin
    Originally posted by condenseddave

    Or, you could be a snot nosed whiner. I really don't know.
    It's why we love the internet.
    LOL. Ain't it grand?

  8. #8
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    I was a trainer for a decade.I was always harder on the guys that showed more potential.They got more grief but it paid for them in the long run........at least three guys I have trained over the years are now running different shops.
    Take your time & do it right!

  9. #9
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    Originally posted by green_apprentice
    Why do apprentice do not get any respect in the trade? For example, senior tech are always puting us down and don"t want to teach us. Don"t get me wrong the marjority techs are helpfull but,some few i cant understand.

    [Edited by green_apprentice on 11-14-2004 at 12:06 AM]
    Personal respect is earned not granted. When I was an unsderclass Midshipman life was hard. And when I became an upperclassman I was hard on the underclass. I was not being just an ass, I wanted the soft or dumb ones to quit, or get the point and put in the effort to become part of the team.

    The senior tech that does not try to teach the apprentice is not part of the team, sorry but you may be stuck with a looser.
    Len
    Old snipes don't die they just loose their steam

  10. #10
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    Don't mind teaching.

    But I have a problem with deaf ears. Or the "that's not my job, do I have to get dirty, I should be making more" attitude.
    Love teaching, love learning. Like to have a "newbie" teach me something and I don't mean understanding M&M's lyrics.
    I did have guys I showed the ropes get my work/hours. When I work for someone else.

  11. #11
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    I am not so convinced that one needs to have a guy actually teaching them. Of course one needs chalkboard time, to go over theory, understand electricity, but that should be done at an approved school, not out on a roof or in a rack room. As you work along side someone, you learn a great deal. What is it that your waiting for, to break out in a coffee moment and have a formal instruction block on your last question? Most times as I was coming up, I would just bust my ass for who I was assisting. Watch em. Get a simple question in. I can remember well, having a long hard day, and that night going over in my mind and in my books what that guy I was working with was doing. Next day I was more on the ball. Next day it got better, so on and so forth it went.

    You know you will reach a point, if your good enough to get that far, and I can tell you most don't, but if your good enough, you will reach a point where you need to teach yourself, and no one will be able to help you.

  12. #12
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    I tell my guys I'm going to teach you everything I know so I don't have to do it anymore.

    However, I don't waste time with guys that don't put out their own effort.

    I hired a guy in June. At first, every time he calls me for troubleshooting, the first question I ask him he hasn't checked. After a couple months he apologizes to me saying "every time I call the first thing you ask me I haven't checked. It's really bothering me, I'm stinking this up." I say what are you doing about it. He says "I'm reading stuff every night so I get to question 2."

    I tell him I don't mind helping him as long as he will put in his time, even check things he wouldn't normally consider a problem. (that's making your own experience) That way I know he gives a rat's tail, and will gain confidence and experience.

    This guy had a recent callback where he tells me he is responsible, he can't in good conscience put hours on the timesheet.

    The fact of the matter is he is my best guy right now. He holds himself to a higher standard. He's going to be just fine, and a bunch of years later he will laugh about it.

    The trouble with alot of guys is that they want to bypass the filter/belt changing because they feel entitled, rather than take that opportunity to learn something about the equipment and move on to the next step. Music to my ears when a newbie is doing menial stuff and pulls out a meter and says something like; "I was doing the filters but noticed this and started checking..." or "that sheave on 5 was out of alignment but it's perfectly.."

  13. #13
    Dear Green, I see that you have edited your post, you say that you do not understand what some of them are saying to you. Look at the way you have put togather the wording and spelling of your post. I had a bit of a problem wadeing through what you were trying to convey.
    Also I have found that new techs think that they have their own way of doing things, and don't have to listen to the sages, they think they are listening, but they are not hearing what he is saying. When you are new, you do not have an opinion, or maybe I should say that your opinion is what ever the tech says, the way HE says it is to be done. Your job is to be a gopher, a knowledge sponge, and a student that reads at home and in the truck. The jump seat is not for sleeping, it is for asking questions and listening to what the master has to say.
    Grasshopper, if you will humble yourself and submit yourself to this art, you will do well.

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