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  1. #14
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Western Wa
    Posts
    1,864
    YTs are the only Yorkies I get to play around with, so I'm not up on the rest of 'em.
    God Bless our Veterans

    God Bless the USA

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    880

    Another same thing only different, again

    I was thinking more about what you had mentioned concerning low speed thrust. This machine uses the York 4 piece coupling with 3 bolts 120* apart and once that unit is tightened down there can't be any movement fore and aft to stress the seal. Excuse me as I'm thinking online. One possibility does exist though. We haven't checked the motor for magnetic center, if it draws aft it adds pressure to the seal and if it draws forward it takes spring pressure off the seal. I worked on another OT that had this big (10") rubber flex coupling with an iron internal and external hub. Even though it was flexible you had to have it perfectly aligned or it wouldn't go together. If you put a strobe light on it you could watch it flex during start-up. Soft starter 45 seconds to come up to speed. I think I may have something else to look at.-GEO

  3. #16
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Western Wa
    Posts
    1,864
    Here again, my familiarity is solely with early 90's to 2000 YTs, and even with the coupling bolted up, you can set up the dial indicator and bar the shaft in and out. This is the coupling with the layers of flexible spring steel between both ends of the central "spool" piece, and the shaft flanges.
    God Bless our Veterans

    God Bless the USA

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    windy city
    Posts
    4,444
    Yep, the shaft flanges, where the guy before you tightens the snot out of the bolts so you can't get it apart, leaving as a last resort cutting the bolts with a metabo............
    \m/
    original member of the racoon brotherhood

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    windy city
    Posts
    4,444
    Quote Originally Posted by ga1279 View Post
    I was thinking more about what you had mentioned concerning low speed thrust. This machine uses the York 4 piece coupling with 3 bolts 120* apart and once that unit is tightened down there can't be any movement fore and aft to stress the seal. Excuse me as I'm thinking online. One possibility does exist though. We haven't checked the motor for magnetic center, if it draws aft it adds pressure to the seal and if it draws forward it takes spring pressure off the seal. I worked on another OT that had this big (10") rubber flex coupling with an iron internal and external hub. Even though it was flexible you had to have it perfectly aligned or it wouldn't go together. If you put a strobe light on it you could watch it flex during start-up. Soft starter 45 seconds to come up to speed. I think I may have something else to look at.-GEO
    The few OT's i've played with had ball bearing motors. I don't believe you'll find much movement. I do have a couple of sleeve bearing motors where you can visually see the motor find magnetic center, with it uncoupled, of course.They'll move 1/2'' from either thrust/counterthrust position to center. Kind of a cool sight the first couple of times.
    \m/
    original member of the racoon brotherhood

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    32
    Quote Originally Posted by heavymetaldad View Post
    Yep, the shaft flanges, where the guy before you tightens the snot out of the bolts so you can't get it apart, leaving as a last resort cutting the bolts with a metabo............
    SORRY !!! now I know not to over tighten them. I have paid dearly for my sins (torn rotator cuffs) ouch,ouch,ouch.
    LOL,LOL,LOL. OUCH 19C

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    880

    In think we may have found out something

    Klove, excuse me as it has been a while since I updated this thread. Actually I have gone so far as to start another post. There was NO low speed thrust. No axial shaft movement. The high speed had min .010". We pulled the compressor out of the scroll housing. After separating all the oil plates on the impeller side the low speed oil pump has burnt oil through it. There is more information on my other post York oil seal, part deux, thanks again-GEO

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by Randy S. View Post
    On the YT's I have under my care, I run them at about a half PSI positive. That gives more oil flow through the seal cavity, and keeps the seal cooler, but still a full cavity. Get the low speed thrust specs for your unit and check to see that you're within specs there, too.
    2-3 works

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    81
    Install washers to increase flow

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by Randy S. View Post
    Well, I'm not familiar with that particular machine, but on the YTs its more like a bearing oil run off that flows through the seal cavity, and the regulator is like a drain regulator. You might want to take it apart and see that it isn't hanging up, or maybe even replace it if it shows any sign of wear. Or be cheap with a piece of crocus cloth and polish it up. The last bellows seal I replaced on an R-123 machine showed signs of overheating. It was set for about a PSIG and a half at 60HZ, Also have a couple 11 machines that haven't seen much surging and have seals in then that are 15 years old. One of my own harebrained theories is that the 123 hardens the o-rings on the shaft and binds the piece that has to move on the shaft with the older seals.
    I agree with 123 statement

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    880

    Another option

    If you don't want to play the washer game, York has an adjustable regulator stem style available for setting seal pressure and jet pump pressure on LTD compressors and HT units makes it a whole lot easier.-GEO

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by ga1279 View Post
    If you don't want to play the washer game, York has an adjustable regulator stem style available for setting seal pressure and jet pump pressure on LTD compressors and HT units makes it a whole lot easier.-GEO
    Interesting, what seal pressure do york recommend when you buy this valve. You got any info on these

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    880

    Adjustable regulator

    All it is, is an adjustable regulator that screws in the same opening as the original hex fitting. You still use the original valve stem and spring, they fit right inside the regulator. It is a whole lot easier to adjust a stem then to have to operate the pump find the pressure then add or take away washers while air gets sucked into the system. Don't have the actual York part #. There is no change of pressure setting for seal relief, it is still the same 2 #'s under full load with 16" hg evaporator pressure.-GEO
    Last edited by ga1279; 10-23-2010 at 01:11 PM. Reason: OOOPS I forgot something
    Once in a while everything falls into place and I am able to move forward, most of the time it just falls all over the place and I can't go anywhere-GEO

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