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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, Kansas, United States
    Posts
    13,832
    if you hooked it up to a head pressure switch and had it work between maybe 200 and 225 pounds or so it may work???

    depends how much water costs

    if the water was from a pond or free may be worth it??
    I WILL SELL WORK,GENERATE BUSINESS, GO GET NEW CUSTOMERS!
    YOU SHUT THE HELL UP AND QUIT RUNNING YOUR MOUTH!

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Houston,Tx.
    Posts
    15,947
    Probably be better off just running a duct down to an enclosed insulated box, that just
    surrounds the condenser coil and let it draw in cold air. Maybe a good idea if you have a a zoned
    system and need to dump some air somewhere.
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    “Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards". - Vernon Law

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  3. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, Kansas, United States
    Posts
    13,832
    yeah!

    if you hade a vvt system?

    you could dump the bypass air onto the condenser!!!


    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Bill View Post
    Probably be better off just running a duct down to an enclosed insulated box, that just
    surrounds the condenser coil and let it draw in cold air. Maybe a good idea if you have a a zoned
    system and need to dump some air somewhere.
    I WILL SELL WORK,GENERATE BUSINESS, GO GET NEW CUSTOMERS!
    YOU SHUT THE HELL UP AND QUIT RUNNING YOUR MOUTH!

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Charm City--the city that bleeds
    Posts
    2,790
    It helps leave mineral deposits on your system components, up to and including the electrical connection portion of your heat rejection motor. Case in point is a customer in above design temps here locally...decided to use water mist to assist the drycooler. One day a different chap turned on the water, and happened to turn it on 100% rather than the usual (reduced) percentage.
    Enter the 4 a.m. service call, complete with a scaled-over motor...just evidence, mind you...

    and a 95 degree data center.
    Oh, BTW, that shorted-out motor with scale everywhere and wet wire nuts's is billable...

    just food for thought.
    It's great to be alive and pumping oxygen!

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    2,644
    Aren't condensing units designed to handle reduced head pressure caused by latent cooling from water?

    It does rain in many places and condensing unit gets wet, ya know.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    4,397
    Quote Originally Posted by ICanHas View Post
    Aren't condensing units designed to handle reduced head pressure caused by latent cooling from water?

    It does rain in many places and condensing unit gets wet, ya know.
    When it rains, very little rain actually gets on the coil unless you have heavy winds and a driving rain. But in that case its only 1, maybe 2 sides of the condenser getting wet. also when its raining the temperature is usually lower and its cloudy, resulting in a lower load on the A/C system which masks the lower capacity of the system.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    2,644
    Quote Originally Posted by craig1 View Post
    When it rains, very little rain actually gets on the coil unless you have heavy winds and a driving rain. But in that case its only 1, maybe 2 sides of the condenser getting wet. also when its raining the temperature is usually lower and its cloudy, resulting in a lower load on the A/C system which masks the lower capacity of the system.
    Hot and muggy, then sudden rain isn't unusual.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,943
    I pump condensate from basement systems onto condenser coils as well as dump condensate from attic systems onto them. Condensate is chilled and distilled and does make a difference in capacity and energy usage.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  9. #22

    Misting Systems on condensers and chiller coils

    Quote Originally Posted by rojacman View Post
    hey Kevin , could you elaborate on your statement "overall freon flow will be reduced , lowering total cooling"........does misting the condenser make that large of a difference to the unit subcooling to affect its performance????? I was going to post about fouling the condenser also . at o'hare airport we found a rooftop full of units that were repainted But no one told the workers not to paint the coils , subject for a different thread.........Jack
    I have done a lot of research on these misting systems. I like to do my homework first before offering items to clients. I have worked with another company who swears by these misting units. Yes, it does work and increases efficiency and reduces power consumption. I can confirm this with all the power recording and power analyzing we had performed. The client was extremely happy! However after returning only 3 months later to perform our PM's on the chiller, we discovered a mass of complete rust! the entire unit frame and coils were oxidized and rusted. The costs of repairs were much more significant than the costs savings. Maybe when someone comes up with a glycol (non-corrosive) system I will entertain this idea again.
    Regards
    Caribb Tech

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Mount Airy, MD
    Posts
    7,281
    Thread relocated to Tech to Tech

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    toledo, ohio
    Posts
    62
    I am guessing that what you are seeing is a drop in condensing pressure so high that the pressure differential required to feed your metering device has been compromised and you are actually under feeding. I have in the past hooked up a solenoid to the inlet water line(hose) and installed a thermostat on the liquid line to activate the solenoid to maintain 110 deg. saturation temp. that works very well.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    winnipeg
    Posts
    1,330
    Quote Originally Posted by passintyme View Post
    I am guessing that what you are seeing is a drop in condensing pressure so high that the pressure differential required to feed your metering device has been compromised and you are actually under feeding. I have in the past hooked up a solenoid to the inlet water line(hose) and installed a thermostat on the liquid line to activate the solenoid to maintain 110 deg. saturation temp. that works very well.
    well said........
    it was working.... played with it.... now its broke.... whats the going hourly rate for HVAC repair

  13. #26
    Where is the water going to drain. will it penatrate the seal around your electrcal control box. Whats the ph of the water who pays for the water . Not as technical as some of the other suggetions but possible considerations.

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